Results for

""

  • > All Sections
  • > News & Insights
  • > Services
  • > Our Work
  • > About Us
  • > Careers
A Cookieless World Conclusion

A Cookieless World Conclusion

As 87% of people now believe data privacy is a right, not a privilege,[1]we, as marketers, should do better to address their growing concerns around how their information is collected and used. It is not only a matter of legal compliance, but also a matter of trust.  In that context, although the recent evolution in the cookies landscape has triggered legitimate concerns around the potential consequences on advertising efficiency and on market dynamics, we should all welcome any change promoting user privacy as a collective, meaningful progress.  Of course, these changes come with their own set of challenges and uncertainties, and the industry will probably have to make do with less - but better - data.  As we have seen in this report:  The leading web browsers are moving away from third-party cookies, creating a fresh paradigm for the digital marketing industry. In 2023, we consider using third-party cookies for advertising purposes should be a relic of the past. Apple is going even further, requiring apps to explicitly obtain consent to keep tracking users.[2] Some digital marketing activities are impacted, such as data management, audience activation, and performance measurement.  Marketers must reconsider how they manage data. This means questioning their current value exchange, improving communications around data privacy, and revisiting their technology needs.  To keep engaging consumers, marketers should investigate the possibilities offered by contextual targeting and cookieless audience targeting alternatives such as persistent IDs.  To measure future performance, marketers will have to combine multiple techniques, from in-platform attribution to incrementality measurement to media mix modelling. A solid testing roadmap will be more important than ever.  There is no silver bullet for this evolution, instead, each brand must develop its unique combination of responses. It is fine if your organisation has not figured out the best option yet. You are not running behind as there is still time to adapt – but you should not wait any longer to plan your transition to a new model.  We expect discussions around privacy and identity to stay at the forefront of the debate even after we have pivoted to the cookieless world.  This is why at dentsu we constantly monitor the martech landscape and are committed to working alongside our clients and partners to imagine and implement solutions that work for all. As a global leader in search marketing, we have implemented advanced cookieless strategies for the world’s largest brands for the last 10+ years. We are using this know-how to help our clients not only thrive in a world free of third-party cookies but do so with speed.  Digital advertising has always been one of the most dynamic and exciting marketing spaces - and we are confident the best is yet to come.    For more, download the full report today: http://ow.ly/KDTK50FKTaJ  [1] Microsoft Advertising in partnership with iProspect, 2020 Consumer Privacy and Brand Trust Survey, Dec 2019 – Mar 2020, as featured in the report In Brands We Trust, published in April 2020  [2] Apple Developer, App Store, User Privacy and Data Use, as accessed on May 4, 2020    0

Making the most of Attention by Aligning UX with Consumer Intent.

Making the most of Attention by Aligning UX with Consumer Intent.

This article is authored by Chris Philp, VP, Lead, SEO and Karen Kysar, Senior Director CX Strategy.    Advertising campaigns are not the only ways for brands to get consumers’ attention. Guiding them when they search for information, helping them to learn more about a topic, and assisting them in accomplishing what they want are powerful means for brands to capture their interest and to influence what happens next.   To design valuable, consumer-centric experiences that will be noticed by their audiences, marketers should focus on three priorities: correctly interpreting intent, solving users’ problems and delivering on expectations.   Understand intent Correctly interpreting intent is not just about observing consumers’ search activities and the various tasks they perform throughout the day, but also about understanding their reasons and the context around them. First-party data is a good place to start. For instance, website analytics inform about the kind of audiences you attract, CRM data show who buys your products, and customer support data cast light on consumers’ struggles. To complement these data sources, ad hoc surveys can capture consumers’ attitudes, motivations and triggers. For example, running a large-scale quantitative survey of first-time moms helps understand what their everyday looks like, where they are seeking advice, and how they handle caregiving issues. To give voice to that data, small-scale user studies enable you to hear directly from first-time moms (e.g., the types of searches they perform). As privacy regulations give consumers more control about how their data is used, we anticipate that consumer surveys will see renewed interest from brands. By encompassing what audiences express and how they interact with your brand, this approach makes it possible to truly know audiences as people. You can then develop actionable portraits rooted in data which help identify areas where your brand is well positioned to win with content and develop content roadmaps that truly address your audience needs.   Solve a problem To help consumers solve a problem, start with a shift in focus from the brand to the consumer. It is about adapting the brand response to the consumer moment, and recognising that all these moments are not necessarily about purchasing a product. For instance, Google has identified four pivotal micro-moments: I want to know, I want to go, I want to do, I want to buy. When first-time moms look to soothe their crying infants, they will often turn to search engines. The keywords they use carry a lot of intent and emotion. A search for “swaddle” may be about looking for a product, while a search for “swaddling” may be about looking for information on whether it is safe. In both cases, these keywords are proxies for the underlying problem: how to get a baby to sleep through the night. In the search engine result pages, results for the “swaddle” query are centred around products – which only partially addresses the bigger problem at play – and there is a lot of advertising competition. Conversely, the query “how to get a baby to sleep through the night” returns the “Interesting finds” component, which provides users the option to land on a content page. For brands, it is an opportunity to demonstrate they understand people’s intent and context, and to provide a valuable solution rather than focusing solely on the product and transaction. From telecom companies developing guides around improving Wi-Fi reception to water treatment companies educating consumers about contamination of water, this approach using value as the key factor to capture attention is applicable across all industries. By understanding intent and assessing the search engine results page and content types delivered, brands can much better assess not only the problem, but the best suited format for delivery, too - whether that is a video, an article, an image or other.   Deliver on expectations Delivering on expectations means ensuring that you are not only showing up when people search, but also that they can convert easily once they land on your website. This requires acting simultaneously in two dimensions: the user experience (UX) and the technical side. There is an important difference between a website that looks clean and a website that is truly user friendly. Analytics can help you detect the most problematic bottlenecks of your website. Then, user testing can help you understand the various reasons behind these bottlenecks, such as a frustrating product catalogue organisation, or an impractical checkout. These insights can help you address the most urgent pain points through A/B testing, and ultimately improve your UX. From a technical standpoint, there is a host of aspects to consider, starting with site speed. Site speed is fundamental in user experience, and has a strong influence on bounce rate and conversions. Marketers should regularly monitor their site speed, using online tools such as Google PageSpeed Insights. Additionally, UX plays an increasingly important role in search engine rankings. From May 2021, page experience signals (e.g., mobile friendliness) will be included in Google Search ranking. Simply put, UX is not only important for making the most of the attention of people who reach your website, but it also conditions your ability to get the attention of additional users through search results!     As one marketer out of two (48%) declares that not being consistent across every element of the consumer experience is a main challenge for long-term trust in their brand (iProspect 2020 Global Client Survey), strategic use of content presents a true opportunity to bring the experience together - from attention to transaction - by making the most of consumer intent and context through value.     This article is excerpted from the report Future Focus 2021: Brands Accelerated. Download it now for key insights on how brands can make the most of brand and performance to accelerate their growth. 0

Trends from global conversation and what they mean for gaming

Trends from global conversation and what they mean for gaming

This article has been written by Lisa Cowie, Head of Agency Research at Twitter, and Thomas Bailly, Global Agency Lead at Twitter. When people care about something, they talk about it. There are hundreds of millions of Tweets sent everyday around the world. What we choose to share says something about us — about who we are, about what interests us, about what we believe in. Conversation gives a window into culture.          Whilst Twitter isn’t short of data, gaining insights from that data requires the right analytical tools. We partnered with Black Swan to analyse 300,000+ topics of conversation. Using AI-driven network science to map conversations into clusters, we looked over 2 years (Jan ‘19 - Dec ‘20) to detect evolving trends. Tweets were analysed across 8 markets - US, Canada, UK, France, Spain, Brazil, Australia and India.    Many conversations persist across markets From a macro perspective, people around the world are talking about a lot of the same things —  but they can manifest differently depending on the cultural context. Our analysis surfaced 6 key spaces:       Understanding culture isn’t about honing into one area that is most obviously connected to a brand or vertical. Conversation is fluid and therefore trends are interconnected. It’s important to consider all the ways that consumers are thinking and behaving, to know what matters to them across many facets of their lives.    Trend #1 - Wellbeing Of course, wellbeing. Conversation has increased by at least 40% in all markets. The notion of #ItsOkayNotToBeOkay has come to the fore, with increasingly frank and open exchanges. #CollectiveHealth. Wellbeing is increasingly being shaped by conversation around ‘communities of care’. Healthcare systems, nursing care, health tech, telehealth services and “looking out for each other” have all seen growth.   Trend #2 - Creator Culture A new generation of entrepreneurs and everyday makers is emerging: the creator class. Spanning those who create for a living through to everyday people who want to inject a bit of creativity into their days. #Participation. Everyone can create. Involvement is more prominent than ever. This notion is fueling the entertainment space as content proliferates from everyday creators and consumption becomes much more social. Conversation around creator culture has increased by +26% in the US and as much as +135% in Brazil.   Trend #3 - Everyday Wonder Escapism is a fundamental human desire. From the cosmos to spirituality to wanderlust, people are immersing themselves in content and experiences. There’s renewed wonder in imagined realities. Fantasy worlds, role-playing, cosplay, sci-fi, and superhero culture are providing ways for people to lose — and find — themselves. The conversation is steadily growing everywhere, with particular resonance in Spain, +35%, and Brazil, +31%.   Trend #4 - One Planet The notion of #BuildBackBetter is emerging as a key driver of the conversation around sustainability and the environment. #TheGreatReset in the US, #GreenRecovery in the UK or #Agenda2030 in Spain are setting the tone, with a focus on regeneration not just sustainability.  There has also been heightened interest in nature and local surroundings — from the impact of climate change to an appreciation for green spaces and the land around us.   Trend #5 - Tech Life A changing dialogue about the way we live, work, and create. As the pandemic hit, a burgeoning reliance on tech in our homes saw more mentions of everything from video calling to smart sensors to connected entertainment to ed tech. Tech Life is expansive - people are talking about smarter living, tech for good and tech angst. The conversation has grown between 30-40% across all markets.   Trend #6 - My Identity People are feeling more supported — and celebrated — to live out loud. #RepresentMe. Equality has become one of the most prominent themes on the platform, as individuals and communities push for real representation. This doesn’t stop at politics, it’s increasingly a topic within entertainment.  As people increasingly define themselves against their values, beliefs or ethics, #BeAnAlly and #TakeAStand are concepts that are gaining traction not just for individuals but within fandoms too. Who you stan says a lot about what you stan. People are realising the power of their fandoms to drive real social change.   The US is seeing the highest growth around this theme, 61%, but with 40%+ growth in all markets the conversation around identity is happening everywhere. ------------- We see those conversations shaping global culture. One of the recurring themes, showing up in conversation and making its way into mainstream culture, is gaming. Let’s look at how the gaming conversation has evolved, and what that means for content creators and brands.   Everyday prevalence of gaming Gaming is a huge area of opportunity for brands, irrespective of their vertical. It sits at the intersection of culture, tech, and content. Mainstream, but also a multitude of niche communities, gaming is spreading far and wide into peoples’ lives, accelerated by the pandemic.    ●2B+ gaming related Tweets globally in 2020, up +75% YOY   ●Globally, people on Twitter are 1.7X more likely to have a connected gaming console and 2.2X more likely to watch competitive video gaming, vs. those not on Twitter.   Gaming shows up within conversation in various ways, driving two of our trend spaces:   Gaming Focus Trend #1 - Creator Culture: Conversational Entertainment Game talk  A new era of gaming, one where games become social experiences. Mentions of games like Among Us, Animal Crossing, Pokemon and Fortnite have all seen huge growth. Conditions of the pandemic have driven usage, but these games inspire connection and conversation.   Streamers Gaming as video content. Increasing mentions of live streams show that gaming is also a consumption experience. #SupportSmallStreamers is gaining traction as more people move into the role of creator, putting out content for their audiences.   Gaming ecosystems Franchises are converging with film and music. In-game social events like concerts are driving conversation around music artists in the same context as gaming.     Gaming Focus Trend #2 - Everyday Wonder: Imaginative Escapism Nostalgic experiences As people seek out comfort in the familiar and iconic, classic franchises like Pokemon, Pacman, Mario, Star Wars characters and countless others have been delighting new and old fans alike.   Immersive narratives Not quite a video game, not quite a movie. Gaming is increasingly being talked about in the realms of characters, settings and stories as people desire full immersion into fantasy-worlds.   Beyond gaming itself Animal Crossing wasn’t just something to do during lockdowns. Conversation on Twitter spiraled into everyday dreaming about travel, holidays and IRL experiences. Hype and conversation around Cyberpunk, the long-awaited game, has moved into story-telling and cosplay (costume play) as people throw themselves into character role-playing.       Acting on the gaming phenomenon If it’s happening in the world, it’s happening on Twitter. Particularly when it comes to the gaming conversation, fans around the world come to Twitter to talk about the biggest moments of the year — the game drops, the fandom, and more, all year long. We see this in the consumption habits of our audiences — during live events, while attention shifts away from other social media, it shifts towards Twitter.   This is why game publishers and esports teams alike are prioritising using Twitter as an immediate distribution platform for their biggest moments. With Amplify, Twitter’s pre-roll video offering, brands can reach the younger demographic who are difficult to reach by TV and the increasing cord-cutters and cord-nevers. From always-on packages with our gaming press partners, to live events and esports opportunities, Twitter has a wide range of solutions to allow brands to align with premium, brand-safe content that resonates with a younger audience, globally.    For more information on Twitter Trends please visit marketing.twitter.com/trends  0