Optimisation of Checkout Flow on the Mobile

Optimisation of Checkout Flow on the Mobile

Want to improve your website's checkout flow on your mobile in order to increase your conversions? 9 out of 10 Danish webshops miss sales.   By focusing more on your users' experience through the flow, it is possible. In this blog post, you will get some pointers on what a good user experience (UX) is on mobile and how you can improve your checkout flow on mobile with a focus on UX.   What is good UX on mobile - and what is not? There are several different definitions of what good UX is. However, the core definition centers around meeting the specific needs of users in specific contexts. By focusing on mobile, you will also be ready for Mobile-First indexing.   When we talk about good UX for mobile, there are some best practices that are an important part of the design process, such as: ·       Prioritise the user ·       Make the navigation intuitive ·       Focus on the user's goals ·       Make the user’s tasks easy to do ·       Build speed into the UX ·       Give feedback to the user ·       Minimise the amount of extra information ·       Layout the design according to the user's hand (see image below)       By having these best practices in mind, you can create a better user experience for users who either visit your home page via mobile or app. Remember that the future of search is about one overall user experience.   How do I create a better checkout flow? Buy-ready users often leave the checkout flow because they experience some form of frustration during the buying process, giving them a poor user experience. Below are some best practices for how you can minimise the users’ feeling of frustration in the checkout flow and thereby give them a better user experience. Getting started with conversion optimization is easy.   Visualise the curve It should be easy and clear for the user to understand and control what is in his/her basket. A rule of thumb is that the user must have clarity about the product, which includes product images and information, such as price and delivery costs. In addition, the user should have the feeling of control when it comes to making changes to the curve. Therefore, the user must be able to update the number, colors, size, etc. as well as remove products from the basket.   Save for later The Save for later feature can be an important factor in the checkout flow, as it allows users to save a product on the page itself and come back to buy it later. Some users assume that websites or apps automatically store the information in the basket, which can create great frustration when they return and discover the basket is empty. Delivery information Filling out a long form is both time consuming and can result in errors and frustrations among users. Therefore, minimise the number of fields to make it easy and fast for users to enter their information. Another thing you can do to optimise the process here is to insert a field with the option to use shipping address as billing address. This eliminates the need for users to enter the same information twice. Auto-fill and error One of the primary purposes of auto-fill is to make it easier and faster for users to fill out a form. At the same time, auto-fill reduces the risk of user error which creates a better user experience. There are several different types of auto-fill options, such as filling in delivery information or finding an address by entering a postcode. Should it happen that a user enters information that contains an error, it is important that the user receives feedback on this. This could be, for example, if the user has entered his telephone number with a 7 or 9 number instead of 8. Then it must be clear in the form where the error is, so that the user can easily and quickly correct the error. The feedback that helps the user detect the error provides a better experience as the user can quickly and easily locate and correct the error. Order overview In the order overview, it is important that the structure of the information is organised in a way that will help streamline the users' checkout. Therefore, the shipping address should be at the top where users have the option to change it. Then the number of products and their details should be displayed to avoid the user going back in the process to make sure that they are the right products. Discounts, delivery costs, VAT and the total price should also be included in the order overview. This way, you avoid an unexpected cost for users later in the process, which prevents them from converting. Payment methods For many users, entering card information on their mobile phone can be cross-border and time consuming. Therefore, you can create a better user experience by offering different payment methods - including the ability to use MobilePay. That way, users avoid entering card information, and some users perceive the method as more secure compared to entering it directly on the website. Another way to create a great user experience is by displaying security and verification images in the payment step. It gives users a sense of confidence and security in the checkout flow.     Purchase confirmation Last but not least, a purchase confirmation contributes to a good user experience, as users now know that the transaction has been completed and a confirmation email has been sent. There are several elements you can consider including in the purchase confirmation to create an even better user experience. For example, you might add an image or illustration that clearly shows the purchase has been completed. Here, users get a sense of a successful checkout process and confirmation  they completed their goal, namely, to buy a product. How do I know if it works? As mentioned earlier, good UX is characterised by meeting the specific needs of the users in specific contexts. The optimizations that are meet your users’ needs and work for your business may not work for another business and their users. It is important to be clear about what your optimizations should improve. The easiest way to do this is to set up different KPIs. With a KPI framework, you always have an overview of what to measure and how it goes. Although the previous sections provide examples of best practices in UX optimization of a checkout flow on mobile, it is not possible to know in advance whether the optimizations you make on your website or app will work with your users. Therefore, it will be important to perform A / B split tests of the optimizations before they are implemented. Here, the different versions are tested against each other, making it possible for you to find out whether the optimizations perform in your checkout flow or not before they are implemented. You should never implement anything without testing it first.   Need help getting started?   You are always welcome to contact us if you want to hear more about how we can help you optimise your checkout flow and UX. We are happy to help you get started, so that together we can create a digital success that drives business performance. 0

6 mins read

TikTok's Uncertain Fate Paves Way for Instagram Reels, As Triller Climbs To No. 1 In App Store

TikTok's Uncertain Fate Paves Way for Instagram Reels, As Triller Climbs To No. 1 In App Store

With the future and fate of TikTok remaining unclear, Instagram Reels and Triller are taking center stage in the short-form category.

9 mins read

Google just became Amazon's biggest competitor

Google just became Amazon's biggest competitor

Google is reinvigorating their marketplace product Buy on Google (formerly called Shopping Actions) by removing commission fees and giving control of the brand experience back to the hands of merchants. These updates represent a direct effort to compete with Amazon and evolve Google’s online shopping experience at a time when people are shopping online more than ever due to COVID-19 closing down physical stores and altering consumer habits.   The announcement made last week highlighted several major changes. Google showcased new payment service platform partnerships with PayPal and Shopify and also expanded data feed integrations within Merchant Center. Google also passed back responsibility to brands for managing customer support, shipping, and returns. Finally, Google has even created a solution which builds feeds directly from Google’s own database.   Buy on Google will disrupt small and large retailers.  A streamlined checkout process has several highlights that are covered in a bit more detail below. 0% commission fees: This is a major change which will encourage all retailers to rethink their Buy on Google strategy.  A comparison that highlights the magnitude of this change:  Previous commission rates on Shopping Actions for apparel product categories was 12%! Updated merchant and financial requirements: The requirements to sell on Shopping Actions are now gone and Google is pulling out all the stops to remove excuses for brands to not onboard. Marketers no longer need a US bank account after linking to GMC with an approved payment service platform account (PayPal and Shopify, to start with). Barriers of entry have been removed: Google has relinquished complete control of payment transactions, managing customer support, as well as returns & shipping. Returning ownership of important brand-owned processes back to the retailer shows that Google is confident in brands meeting customer expectations for purchases made on Google Shopping. Product feed integrations: Google Merchant Center is supporting non-Google product feed uploads, by their greatest ecommerce and marketplace competitor - Amazon. Focus on supporting small businesses: Consumers will soon be able to filter and view products sold by small business merchants specifically.   What was missing in the announcement Google has been slowly rolling out new features and updates over the past several months around other organic and unpaid feed-powered listings. Retailers activating on the Buy on Google program can also opt-in at the same time to these free Google products listings called Surfaces Across Google. The same product feed powers both programs so merchants not only have commissions removed for Google’s marketplace but their catalog will now serve across multiple shopping experiences without paid media.  We predict that in the near future to see Buy on Google checkout options begin to show on organic search results, such as on the Knowledge Graph - a previously paid ad listing placement. While this experience is what we expect next, the details still follow suit on aggregating paid and free product listings to their specific ad placements across Google properties. Shopping Actions:  A solution in search of a problem...until now The Google marketplace (Shopping Actions) has struggled to burst through the bubble of mass adoption by merchants with spending the last seven years expanding and rebranding the program. The removal of commission fees is a unique value proposition and explicit advantage against marketplace rivals like Walmart and Amazon, but also a deep benefit for small businesses that started digital ecommerce on eBay and Etsy. The payment system partnerships have made up for years of minimal merchant integrations. To compensate and attempt to counter Amazon’s two million+ small businesses already selling on that marketplace, Google chose to integrate the Amazon catalog into Google Merchant Center. This has never happened in the history of Google and is unprecedented. What Google now has is a data set of product information far more robust than their own catalog. Shopify has a small business customer base of one million (and growing) on the platform which now brings a larger assortment of products, and new small businesses that have minimal reason to not now sell on Google marketplace. What does this mean for your business? Brands who have refused to launch on marketplaces like Amazon now have minimal hesitation to begin selling on Google. Nike has refused to sell on Amazon for some time due to not being able to own the customer experience. Brands should focus on evaluating their media plan and product feed strategy. This would entail identifying product lines, seasonality SKUs, and less profitable products to be specifically assigned as eligible to serve in a marketplace, organic/unpaid listings or paid campaigns. This granular setup is especially important due to limited reporting features and forecasting features within the Google Merchant Center--feature gaps which will hopefully be addressed by Google in the future. Google is placing a strategic bet on small businesses to lean into their marketplace by removing commission fees and reducing barriers to entry. These changes were driven by Google’s Bill Ready, a former PayPal executive, executive leader at Braintree & Venmo, and supporter of small business commerce for over a decade. When it comes to steering a ship such as Google marketplace in a new direction, his vision shows the understanding of how small businesses are driving the future of marketplace commerce. However, even if the primary focus of these changes appears to be small businesses, if large brands don’t take the time to review their current Google Shopping approach and leverage these new features, they will be the ones missing out on a major commerce opportunity during this coming holiday season. 0

5 mins read

Online to offline: Supporting store re-openings through paid search

Online to offline: Supporting store re-openings through paid search

As we find ourselves approaching the four-month point since the national lockdown was introduced in the UK, it is interesting to consider just how much the population has adapted to the restrictions imposed; cluttered kitchen tables have transformed into office spaces, re-arranged living rooms into stay-at-home workout areas and Zoom chats have come to substitute, well, pretty much any social event that we can virtually re-imagine! In a similar way, digital platforms became almost the only way for brands to maintain engagement with their consumer base after the closure of high street stores on the 24th March. Uplifts in the number of consumers exploring e-commerce made these platforms more valuable than ever to brands, evidence of which can be seen in many cases through increased investment in digital development and advertising. Some brands adapted to these changes in consumer behaviour like ducks to water whereas others faced immediate challenges, at times attracting un-wanted media coverage in the process. Limitations of platforms came under increased scrutiny and issues at production level were exacerbated by social distancing measures, but overall, digital has stood up well in these testing times, and now provides businesses with a path for growth. Prior to stores re-opening there was a feeling of ambivalence towards the predicted number of consumers feeling comfortable enough to visit them, and concerns around how this would affect in-store performance. However so far, the signs have been positive in favour of a high-street recovery; store footfall jumped up by 38.8% on the 15th June as non-essential shops re-opened and footfall on England’s high streets specifically measured 50.5% higher than the week previous (econsultancy.com). These statistics suggest that consumer confidence hasn’t been hampered as severely as first thought, and the demand for physical stores still holds viability for brands. Nevertheless, recent events have no doubt led to a further blurring of the lines between online and offline retail, making it now an important time for brands to re-evaluate the ways in which their online activity can complement their offline strategy. The role of online activity within the consumer journey is highly regarded by many marketers, and a publication from JRNI reported that 73% of users in the UK say that they research digitally before going on to purchase in store. Bridging the gap between online and offline retail was a developing area within Google paid search long before the days of toilet roll shortages and Tiger King-mania, which began with the introduction of Google My Business to help drive footfall to stores via maps and directions. In reaction to widespread adoption and strong performance, advertisers now find themselves with an ever-increasing arsenal of technologies becoming available. One of the first Google Ads features to appear in support of physical stores was the location extension, which has since been utilised by many brands. Featuring across the Google search network, these extensions commonly appear beneath paid search ads to provide information about stores local to the user. When delivered on a mobile device they can also display a “call” button, making these extensions a particularly useful feature for businesses that rely on real-time conversations, or apprehensive shoppers wishing to check stock availability before venturing out. ‘Local campaigns’ were another evolution of Google’s online-to-offline offering when they were introduced last year, allowing advertisers to dedicate budget entirely to the pursuit of in-store footfall via paid search platforms. These campaigns use a combination of text, image and video assets to reach users across Google search platforms and give brands more power to communicate with consumers at the right time. As stores can appear to users within Google Maps without actively searching for them (in the form of a branded drop-pin), local campaigns can hold value in supporting upper funnel tactics. Figure 1: Example of a branded drop-pin and ad within Google Maps (Google) Conversion tracking is also available to advertisers that meet Google’s eligibility criteria, the requirements of which include sufficient store locations and traffic amongst other attributes. Once set in place, conversion tracking allows advertisers to see within Google Ads exactly which campaigns, keywords and devices drive the most store visits. These metrics are extremely useful in understanding return on investment and better evaluating the effectiveness of your messaging. As well as providing geographical information about store locations, Google also make it possible to integrate the availability of in-store stock via the use of local inventory ads (or LIA for short). Working in a similar way to shopping campaigns, these ad formats require the set-up of a dedicated feed into the Google Merchant Centre and give users the ability to browse products local to them within a Google-hosted virtual shop called the ‘Local Storefront’. With a reported 50% of shoppers globally checking online before considering an in-store purchase (Google), this feature holds a great advantage for brands looking to create synergy between their online-to-offline shopping experience and provide a seamless user journey. Figure 2: Example of LIA on a mobile device (Google) Aside from the many inherent benefits they offer to consumers including added convenience and avoidance of delivery charges, click and collect services have provided an attractive prospect for brands wanting to turn online traffic into physical store visits for several years. The availability of click and collect through Google as an accompaniment to LIA now means that more and more brands can implement this tactic as a part of their online-to-offline strategy. The features covered in this blog are only a handful within Google’s current repertoire, and the tech giant have made no secret of their plans to expand this area of paid search significantly over the coming months. With so many options available for brands looking to bolster their online-to-offline strategy, understanding how each can support your business objectives is conducive to a successful strategy. Just like many marketing exercises, testing offline campaigns in unison with your existing digital activity is the best way to gauge their impact upon your performance. Starting out with a small, focused strategy around a few stores before slowly scaling up can be a good way to gain valuable insights without spending a fortune. Early adoption within fast-developing areas such as online-to-offline can often hold advantage for brands willing to dip their toes in the water. It could also prove instrumental in building consumer relationships and driving performance within a post-Covid world.   This article was written by Rick Hewitt. Rick is a Paid Search Executive with over two years’ experience at iProspect and a prior background within the advertising and marketing industry. His current role specialises in the planning and activation of paid search strategies for an international fashion brand across EMEA markets. 0

6 mins read

Unlocking Data-Driven Creative Personalization

Unlocking Data-Driven Creative Personalization

The in’s and out’s of delivering real-time creative for an audience of one. Creative personalization at scale is an essential way for brands to unlock exponential growth and efficiencies in media. The need for advertisers to stay true to their brand and speak to individuals on a personal level, without sacrificing brand identity is becoming increasingly critical. Consumers ultimately see one output, a creative piece which is the voice of a brand. All the work invested in understanding the audience, mapping the customer journey, identifying channels to activate within, are all designed to help brands connect with those they identify as potential consumers.  Although brands have been building amazing creatives for years, the proliferation of media and data has created a challenge for brands; building data-driven creatives at scale. Without data-driven creative personalization in place, how can brands continue to attract new consumers and most importantly, retain their attention? According to eMarketer and Google insights, less than one percent of all display creatives served in Canada include an element of personalization. Yet, Canadian brands continue to invest over $3 billion dollars into display advertising each year.  Brands that succeed at integrating customer data and signals within their creative can test, track and optimize creative in real-time - guaranteeing that the right offer and message is served to the right customer, and generate significant efficiencies in media activation. This allows brands to resonate better with audiences, deepen the relationship and maintain their competitive edge. By combining all these data points, it enables brands to have real-time, specific, and precise targeted conversations with their audiences. Using Signals to Understand Audiences Most marketers think they know their customers, while audience segmentation is often neglected or not utilized to its full potential. The first step of data-driven creative personalization requires a deep understanding of these audience segments. This requires brands to look beyond first-party data and combine internal data sets, website analytics, and purchase data with external sources, such as weather, competitor activity, and market signals.  Doing so enables brands to get a holistic view of the different audience segments they want to engage, along with the tone of their brand message tailored to the individual’s interests and needs. Brands should go beyond demographics when looking deeper into audience insights, as it will not only be more effective, but significantly more efficient in delivering the message. Combining these segments and signals against market trends and opportunities will result in hundreds, if not thousands, of possible combinations between audience, message, incentive and creative.  Creating a Scalable Creative Template  Personalization is a two-way communication - the customer provides signals and intent data, and the brand offers relevant solutions to address their needs and desires. It requires careful planning and a suitable process to building a creative library—one that has unique messages for different audiences and different tactics and various phases.  It also requires excellent planning to leverage typography, iconography, imagery, font and photography. Coming up with the right template is a creative and data problem grounded in a team that can effectively solve the same puzzle. Once the creative’s associated trigger fires, technology allows for optimization, where future potential customers receive appropriate triggered messages based on their position in the sales funnel. This becomes more important, especially when taking into consideration that consumers nowadays are on a constant journey. Most of us go through thousands, of touch points before converting, sharing our time across multiple screens simultaneously.  A Full Funnel Approach For marketers, the purchase funnel is wildly more complicated than it was just a few years ago. The display channel playing a particularly crucial role in driving new prospects into a funnel and closing the loop by driving sales. Yet so many brands are still focusing on either a prospecting, or remarketing strategy only. Having a holistic, full funnel, year-round approach becomes more important than ever before, and it allows brands to speak to and respond to their target audience when their consumers' preferences are shaped. It also allows for constant flow of new audiences into the funnel by adding them to prospecting audiences, while optimizing existing audiences lower down the funnel to close the sale.    Step 1 | Prospecting at Scale Speaking to consumers on an individual level and achieving personalization at scale all at once can be daunting at first. Figuring out the initial message and creative requires taking a closer look at behaviours, patterns, and habits to understand audiences at a meaningful level - first impressions count for a lot. That’s why it’s essential to talk to people when they’re in shopping mode. Programmatic does a fantastic and vital job of utilizing behaviour and analytical signals (Example Site Visit, and Interest,) to identify audiences with the highest intent and use those signals to make creative more relevant and tailored to the viewer. Smart Bidding then ensures the strongest performing creative is appearing in the right place, at the right time, to the right person. One of our travel clients discovered that utilizing imagery of the destination along with unique attributes generated 100 percent more clicks to site and 55 percent increase in conversions.  Step 2 | Remarketing at scale As there are more platforms, more signals, and more data sources to inform the creative process than ever before, creative assets are playing a crucial role as the consumer moves down the sales funnel and is especially effective when it comes to closing the actual conversion. Remarketing not only allows for advertising of relevant recommendations on products that they selected and expressed interest in, but also can incorporate suggestions on products they didn’t even think about - such as valuable bundles and offers. A perfect example with a client, operating in the Home Security space, that leveraged remarketing creative to provide site visitors with unique incentives and promotions on alternative products, once they left the site to ensure they returned, resulting in a 24% improvement in conversion.  Remarketing can be highly effective but can appear to be creepy or irrelevant if not done correctly or in a meaningful way. Brands need to get more sophisticated than just providing the same product the consumer shopped for in a banner ad. The most relevant remarketing creatives are ones that suggest complementary product skews to go with an actual purchase. Where a brand traditionally excludes audiences if they purchased a product, we've worked with a leading speaker brand have identified the best window for remarketing, was 48 hours post sale. They've leveraged this insight to deliver upsell opportunities on additional speakers, just when customers would have received their initial shipment, and the product interest is at its highest.   Ensuring teams pay attention to the frequency of their retargeting campaigns is also critical. This tactic can get irritating to the viewers, if not observed correctly or managed properly. Although remarketing CPC/CPM tend to be lower than prospecting, it’s not a reason to bombard customers with the same message repeatedly. It may cause creative fatigue over time and feel intrusive to many consumers.    Step 3 | Personalization at scale Personalization at scale helps consumers resonate with the ads and speaks to them on a more individual level. It focuses on user experience; ultimately allowing for better ad engagement. This is where the true value of personalization is unlocked for brands and where marketing effectiveness is maximized. It implies a deep understanding of the customer wherever they interact and regardless of how they engage with a brand.  Brands that know how to leverage personalization effectively - generated significant value from media. Aligning Technology Stack To work at this pace, and scale, requires an agile process, to replace the old ones.    Leaders in personalization and data-driven creative are continually testing and that requires putting a team together that not only has the right skills but also understands how to work together.    A cohesive team is also able to leverage signals better, both from 1st part data and other signals like market, weather, and other competitor elements to deliver better messaging and creativity as well as enhance customer value where it’s possible.  That is why aligning on a technology stack, for example the Google Marketing Platform, enables teams to make changes and optimizations faster, as well as easily measuring the true impact of each creative towards business goals. Its integrated workflows built on a solid floodlight configuration combined with the most robust data privacy protection standards makes GMP an attractive option to choose. A Shift in Mindset for Better Personalization Although, there isn’t an exact formula to where the line stops with personalization. Marketing teams need to do a better job of bridging creative data (Offer, Design, Copy Lines, Images, etc.,) AND media data (Audience, Conversion, Format, Inventory, etc.,) to identify the threshold and determine what drives the incremental sale, while ensuring seamless and meaningful customer experience. Consumers see value in function while marketers are challenged to deliver more for less. Brand leaders who master data driven creative personalization will create value for consumers in high-priority areas and in an environment of increased competition. More importantly, they’ll drive amazing experiences to consumers.   0

8 mins read

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dentsu bolsters global media offering by bringing together iProspect and Vizeum brands to form future-focused iProspect brand globally

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A Brand's Guide To Working With TikTok Creators

A Brand's Guide To Working With TikTok Creators

If you’ve been in the app store lately you might’ve noticed this logo to right holding it’s spot in one of the top ten free apps for quite some time. This app is called TikTok, featuring short 15 to 60 second short videos, which are soundtracked by music clips. Content is comedic, on-trend, and interactive. It sits amongst other popular social apps like Instagram, Snapchat and Facebook. It is one of the fastest growing social platforms in history. As of November 2019 TikTok has over 1 billion users on its platform in 150 countries and has been downloaded over 123 million times. If your brand’s target audience includes anyone between the age 13 and 30, you should be on TikTok right now. Users have all sorts of tools at their disposal right in the app: amazing filters, effects and sounds to score your video. Unlike our old friend Vine, TikTok has created a one stop shop for editing. Users don’t need to use third party apps to create interesting content. Users can engage with one another through “response” videos or by means of “duets” — users can duplicate videos and add themselves alongside. Hashtags actually exist as a real, functional organizing principle: not for news, or even really anything trending anywhere else than TikTok, but for various “challenges,” or jokes, or repeating formats, or other forms of activity.   “If your brand’s target audience includes anyone between the age 13 and 30, you should be on TikTok right now.”   Instagram’s “Discover” page includes images that may somewhat relate or interest you but TikTok's similar “For You” page has an even more advanced and engaging algorithm. With a full vertical screen experience, users dive down a rabbit hole of curated content. The app allows users to easily connect, create friendships, and collab with others. Every week there’s new trends, which makes it easy to go viral and increases the potential for popularity. Creators have identified this supportive environment to grow followers and have left Instagram for TikTok. Not only that, but the engagement rate on TikTok is absolutely wild. If I haven’t sold you on why you should be on TikTok at this point, here are a few more statistics that showcase how powerful this app is and is still becoming… TikTok has about 800 million monthly active users with about 60 million of those being in the United States TikTok users spend 52 minutes in the app on average a day A user opens TikTok 8 times per day on average Of their users, 60% are female, 40% are male Of their users 60% are between the ages of 16-24 and 26% are between the ages 25-44  60% of TikTok users are GenZers and next year, 74 million people in the U.S. will be part of “GenZ”, which will make it the largest generation of all How can a brand engage with TikTok Creators like we do Instagram Influencers? Working with TikTok Creators has its similarities to working with influencers on Instagram but because these social media platforms differ in the content you create there are a few differences in strategy that you need to think about as a brand. To make it easier, I’ve laid out the 5 steps to working with TikTok Creators…   Identify your audience Select the right TikTok Creators Develop content concepts and creative brief Outreach to TikTokCreators with collaboration opportunity Make sure the content has trackable conversions STEP 1: IDENTIFY YOUR AUDIENCE    One of the first steps in working with creators on TikTok to promote your brand is identifying whether or not it is appropriate for the age demographic that is currently using TikTok. For example if your product or service is geared towards men and women between the ages of 30 to 50, TikTok might not be the best platform to do your influencer marketing. Remember, roughly 50% of TikTok's global audience is under the age of 34 with 26% between 18 and 24. This isn’t to say that TikTok won’t expand into an older demographic in the future, it very well could, but right now it’s sitting with a younger demographic. If you have identified that your brand is on target with TikTok's age demographic the next step is to decide if your product/service is for men, women or both genders. Just like working with Instagram influencers you will want to choose your TikTok Creator’s gender based on the use of the product/service you are trying to promote. Next you’ll need to decide how your brand can be displayed by a creator on TikTok. With Instagram we are often used to product images with an influencer on a static feed or Instagram stories that include a review of the product. TikTok is not the place for videos of people talking about a product, users on TikTok will quickly be bored by this type of content. If they wanted that type of content they would be on Instagram. Like I mentioned before, TikTok videos are creative short form content that either include a sound or music as a score or are quality comedy that keeps the user interested. Here’s a good example of a brand collaboration on TikTok that showcases the brand and also does it in a way that stays in line with TikTok's type of content. This is pretty much the same strategy you would employ for the rest of your influencer campaigns. One of the best ways to come up with ideas to promote your product on TikTok is to get on the app and scroll through the For You Page for about 20 to 30 mins. Quickly you’ll catch on to the trends and type of content that these users are interested in. If you are able to come up with some ideas of how your product can be used by a TikTok creator in a video, then the next step is to choose your creators! STEP 2: SELECT THE RIGHT TIKTOK CREATORS     While TikTok has made a Creator Marketplace that brands and agencies can request to join, the platform is ever growing with influential creators every week. For example, popular TikTok creator Charli D’Amelio reached 6.2 million followers on TikTok is just 4 months, and has a total of 123.7 million likes across all of her videos. That’s why it’s important for you or your campaign manager to get on TikTok and start exploring through hashtags and challenges to see who the hottest creator is at this very moment. Unlike Instagrams current algorithm that often makes even the best content not get as much engagement as it deserves, TikTok's algorithm essentially allows quality content to go viral. While follower count is no doubt important when choosing a creator to work with on TikTok, it’s equally as important to look at the content they are making and identify how much engagement each of their videos gets. It’s possible for a creator with over 100k followers to only get 3,000 likes on a video. And unlike Instagram, you cannot blame your decrease in likes on the algorithm because if the content is good on TikTok you will go viral. TikTok users spend less time in their following page and more time on the For You Page. Think of it like the discover page on any other social media app. When a user posts a video on TikTok, that video automatically ends up on a few other users For You Pages at random, if the content is interesting to those users that are served it on their FYP they will watch the full video and maybe give it a like. The more users who engage with the content on the FYP will ensure it ends up on other FYPs. You can get served content on your FYP from months before, so the reach is huge if you choose the right creators who have the ability to make good viral videos on TikTok. You want to look at the TikTok creators who have consistent views, likes and comments on the past 10 videos on their feed. That will be the best indicator that they are a good influencer to work with. If you aren’t seeing any creators on TikTok's Marketplace that you would want to work with, there’s an easy way to find some creators organically through the app. Use the hashtag search and type in something that relates to your brand. For example, if your brand is a makeup product try searching #makeuptutorial or #makeup on the app. Look through some of the top videos, check out the users that posted them, look at their profiles and other video’s success. Look through the hashtags, the most popular videos will often show up first. From this you can come up with a good list of creators that would be good to promote your makeup product on TikTok. STEP 3: DEVELOP CONTENT CONCEPTS AND CREATIVE BRIEF     When working with TikTok Creators, you might want to be more specific in your content asks to ensure you get the best results. TikTok videos are popular when they include several or one of the following:   Music or Sound Narrative Dance Lip syncing Transitions Interactivity Challenges Remember, you want to build content that centers around your marketing strategy without overtly calling it out. If your brand isn't super used to building video content, don't sweat the details. If you have an idea in mind, outline it in a creative brief that you will share with the creator once you’ve confirmed a collaboration. It is important to outline your asks before you begin your outreach because if you are looking for a specific type of talent in TikTok video creation, you will need to be sure that the creators you’ve picked to reach out to have it. Remember, you want this to play out organically and not have it feel like one of thousands of video ads your audience has ignored. Here are some good examples of each of the outlined “talents” that you could be looking for in TikTok video creation: Music or Sound: Example #1, Example #2, Example #3, Example #4, Example #5, Example #6, Example #7, Example #8 Narrative: Example #1, Example #2, Example #3, Example #4, Example #5, Example #6 Dance: Example #1, Example #2, Example #3, Example #4 Lip Syncing: Example #1, Example #2, Example #3,  Transitions: Example #1, Example #2, Example #3, Example #4 Interactivity: Example #1, Example #2, Example #3 Challenges: Example #1, Example #2, Example #3   If you aren’t sure what kind of video would work creatively or catch attention you can ask the creator if they have any ideas or thoughts on what would work. Remember, they are the ones who are able to get their videos to scale on the platform, so they know the best techniques to ensure maximum reach. TikTok is an app that allows you to lean on the influencer to come up with the best ideas for a brand collaboration. One thing you’ll want to be sure you provide them with once you confirm a collaboration is a short list of value props, tag lines, hashtags etc. Be sure to give them enough information on the brand or product/service for them to develop an idea for the video.   STEP 4: OUTREACH TO TIKTOK CREATORS     Once you’ve identified a list of TikTok creators you would like to work with and crafted a creative brief and or basic outlines for the collaboration, you will need to look for the Creator's contact information. Since TikTok isn’t as advanced in the influencer space as Instagram is for example, it might be harder to find contact information. A good TikTok campaign needs the right creators to have any impact.   The steps outlined below are the best to follow if you can’t find a TikTok Creator’s contact information in the TikTok Creator Marketplace:   Check their TikTok profile to see if their contact info is listed in their bio Check to see if they’ve linked their Instagram account on their TikTok profile, go to their Instagram account from there and see if their contact info is listed Check to see if they’ve linked their YouTube account on their TikTok profile, go the about section and see if there’s any info that can lead you to a way to contact them TikTok does not allow DMs between two accounts that do not follow each other. (this is to protect the significantly younger demographic that is on TikTok). If you can’t find contact information with the steps above, then you can resort to the below options if you would still like to reach out to that specific Creator:   Create a TikTok account on behalf of the brand and comment on the Creator’s video asking if there’s a good email address to contact them at for collaborations If they have their Instagram account connected but no contact information listed on there either, go to Instagram and send them a DM asking for their contact information If they are a large enough TikTok Creator trying Googling their contact information or see if they have any type of website or other social media accounts out there that could give you that information STEP 5: MAKE SURE YOU CAN TRACK CONVERSIONS   Like in any influencer marketing campaign, in order to make sure you get your return on investment (ROI), you need to include something in the creator’s content that ensures you can track the success of the partnership between the brand and the Creator. To do this you will first need to identify your goal for working with TikTok influencers: Increase social traffic (ie followers on instagram, facebook etc.) Drive revenue Create content Brand awareness Increase Social Traffic There’s a few ways you can increase social traffic on your Instagram or Facebook from a creators post on TikTok. One way is to create a giveaway, and when the creator posts their branded TikTok video they can include in the caption outlining how you can win something by entering this giveaway. In order to enter the giveaway one of the steps can be to follow the brand’s Instagram or Facebook page. To track the growth over time you can use a tool like SquareLovin to see how many followers and or engagement the accounts are getting over the period of the campaign. Drive Revenue   The easiest way to drive revenue through TikTok videos at this present moment is through discount codes. This will be the only way to really see what revenue is being driven from a TikTok creators post. TikTok doesn’t have stories that include swipe up links like Instagram does so your best bet is to ask the creator to include a personalized discount code in the caption of their video, or as overlaying text and drive the viewer to purchase using their discount code.   Create Content   If your goal is to create content that you can repurpose for ADs there’s a few things you’ll need to keep in mind. Since TikTok uses music and sound in it’s videos you’ll want to instruct your creators to either use no music or make sure you have the rights to a specific song. A brand can also make a TikTok account and upload their own sound if they have one already created for the brand, you can find instructions on how to do that here. The only hurdle you’ll have here is to make sure you don’t have copyrighted sound. Other than that, you will probably be able to get some quality content that you can piece together in a mashup for ADs and test how it does on other networks. Brand Awareness   Since challenges are extremely popular on TikTok, one of the best ways to increase brand awareness is to select some TikTok creators to take part in a challenge that encourages their viewers to partake as well. You can reference some of the challenge examples videos listed in Step #3 to get some inspiration for a good challenge that increases awareness of your brand. 0

13 mins read

YouTube SEO Guide

YouTube SEO Guide

0 You have probably heard of Search Engine Optimization (SEO) before. But not many people have heard about YouTube SEO and channel and video optimization on the world's second largest search engine. The more a video is optimised, the better it will rank and the more positive its effect on the rest of the channel. In this YouTube SEO guide, you can learn a lot about how to optimise your presence on the video platform. I will take you through all the important steps. Why work with video and YouTube at all? In 2021, video will account for 82% of total internet traffic. At the same time, video consumption on mobile is up 22% YoY. And there is nothing to suggest that growth will stop any time soon. Four times as many consumers would rather watch a video about a product than read about it. Source: Search Engine Land We also pay more attention when we are on YouTube. This is especially important to those who are running advertising on YouTube.     Source: Ipsos/Google, Think With Google, Google Video plays an important role in the user journey because it has become a natural part of the way we search for products and services. Accordingly, YouTube has also become an integral part of the user journey before, during and after the purchase.   You can read more about how to work with your YouTube SEO and strategy in the following sections. Your YouTube optimization should start with a strategy It is important to have a clear strategy for your YouTube channel and content. As with all other marketing, having a clear strategy helps you make good decisions. There are two main types of content on YouTube. Hygiene content is by far the most frequently used and it is likely this is the kind of content you want to maximise. But there is also hero content, which can be quite extraordinary. Examples of hero content are Volvo's Epic Split and Nike's video with Colin Kaepernick. What is the purpose of your channel? Would you like to raise awareness about your brand? Or are you using the channel as a customer service extension? Are you going to run YouTube advertising while doing organic YouTube optimization? There are many options. Typically, it takes 24-48 hours for a video to be properly indexed on YouTube once it is uploaded. Therefore, it may be a good idea to wait a bit to start advertising, as YouTube does not initially know what your video is about and its relevant audience. Starting advertising right away can have an effect on your ROI. Once you have made your YouTube strategy, you can start breaking it down into smaller - and more manageable - goals and sub-goals. Give each goal a clear KPI so you can see if you are successful with your YouTube optimization. End with identifying audiences. By doing this you go from having a typically generic strategy to having multiple direct measurement points and actions. It is easier to do YouTube SEO when you know how to be successful. Need help with your strategy and goals? Keep track of your KPIs here.   What can be optimised? There are a lot of things you can optimise with YouTube SEO. This applies to both the channel itself, playlists, and videos. On some things you can have influence directly, while you can only indirectly influence others. You can read more about the most important things to optimise later in the blog post.   This word cloud highlights many of the factors affecting your SEO ranking. Some aspects, like channel age and video age, cannot be changed or optimised. Yet an older video and channel can have an advantage, just as the age of a website also has something to say in regular SEO. The sooner you start with YouTube SEO and optimizing your content, the sooner you can reap the benefits. You can optimise several of the factors that you cannot directly influence. We will tell you more about this in How to grow your channel with YouTube SEO. Keyword research for YouTube is different Finding relevant keywords for your YouTube SEO can be a little difficult. This is because, among other things, there is no direct access to search volume on YouTube keywords, as there is on Google. But fear not. It is still possible to find keywords and learn more about the keyword volumes. To do this, use the following tools: ·       Keywordtool.io ·       Keyword Planner ·       Google Trends ·       YouTube You identify relevant YouTube keywords with Keyword Tool and YouTube. Keyword Planner and Google Trends will help you determine how big your potential search volume is. Keep in mind that Keyword Planner gives you the number of monthly searches on Google - not YouTube. As you can see, there are many steps in a YouTube keyword research. However, it is important that you spend the time to find your relevant keywords as they are crucial to your success. Ahrefs.com also has a YouTube keywords explorer for you to use. Bear in mind that there are many other keyword tools out there. It is important that you constantly think about your keyword relevance. If your keywords are not relevant to the video, your work will be wasted. You cannot cheat your way to relevance. The users and YouTube will decide this swiftly and without hesitation. Do not solely look at volume. At first, go more for niche keywords that are not dominated by major international channels. The content and quality of the video has a lot to say, but it is virtually impossible to compete with the very large channels - especially if you are a new channel. Keep in mind the value of Google and video views. Some Google searches naturally return video results while others do not. By spending some time checking this, you are better equipped to have your YouTube video appear in a Google search result. Rich media, such as videos, takes up an increasing amount of space and provides a good user experience. Therefore you should embed your YouTube video on a related page of the website whenever possible – and relevant. You can get the embed code for a video by right-clicking it. You can do this with all videos, not just your own. The addition of videos helps make your site more valuable to users while increasing watch time - which is even more important. There are several different tools that can help track YouTube placements and find relevant keywords. I focus on the free tools in this blog post. How to grow your channel with YouTube SEO It may sound simple, but there are just a few steps to growing a channel. But, as you have probably guessed, that does not mean it is easy to succeed in creating a successful YouTube channel.   This is a simplified user journey on YouTube. Sometimes it can be a long time from when a user first sees your video until she subscribes. And it can happen in minutes in other instances. It is all about creating relevant content that engages the user and adds value for that user. You may ask: ·       How do I get discovered? ·       How do I maintain my target audience? ·       How do I get subscribers? ·       How do I get my users to see even more content on my channel? The answer to each of these questions is quite simple. You do this by making good and productive videos and subsequently optimizing them. Just as you would do with a website. You can have the best content in the world but if the website is not optimised (both on-page and technical), no one will see it. Great content is the foundation on which all successful YouTube channels are built. With YouTube SEO you can take your users through the entire user journey from discovering your video to watching your video and clicking "subscribe" to seeing even more of your content. There are a lot of ways you can optimise your videos in terms of both visibility and CTR as well as guiding users further along, when they discover you. It will be a great waste of effort to get users to watch your video and not retaining them afterwards. As I wrote earlier, there are many factors that influence your rankings and YouTube watch time and retention. The number of minutes and hours users watch your videos is one of the most important factors. You can increase this by creating great content and optimizing it to have more people discover and watch your videos. It is helpful to provide viewers with sneak peeks that entice them to continue viewing other videos on your channel. Never write something in your title or thumbnail that you cannot live up to in the video. Using cards and end screens, you can keep users in your YouTube universe (see example of a good end screen below). Once your video ends, serve new and relevant content to the user. Many people discover and watch new videos that are presented to them directly, so remember to make playlists - and optimise them. I wrote earlier that it is important to have relevant keywords because relevance promotes retention. Yet there will always be some users who will drop out after about ten seconds – especially if the video is not relevant according to the title and/or keywords. Your goal is for each user to watch as much of the video as possible. It is a clear indicator of quality. If most people quit after a short time and no one watches through to the end, it is likely a sign you have either the wrong keywords or a poor-quality video. You can optimise the channel itself (layout and tabs), playlists and videos. Next, I will take you through the most important optimizations for YouTube SEO. Get control of upload, optimization, and subtitles I am not able to address all the possibilities for optimization in this blog post. Some, such as cards and end screens, I will only mention in passing, as entire blog posts can be written about these optimizations alone. Sizes and dimensions of banners, files, and thumbnails are important to keep in mind. The optimal size for a YouTube thumbnail is 1820 x 720 pixels. It all starts with the channel   In fact, YouTube SEO starts even before you upload your first video. If you do not have a YouTube channel, create one.   Give it a good name. The name is not visible on the page, but it will be used in the channel URL. You can change the name afterwards. The name should be easy to remember and include the brand or company name. If possible, include keywords in the name as well – but do not keyword stuff it.   Next, you need to create a Brand Account - not a personal one. If you already have a channel but have doubts about the setup, you can easily check it out.   Once the channel is big enough, apply for the YouTube Partner Program. You must have 4,000 valid public watch hours and more than 1,000 subscribers before you can apply for the partner program. Upload video Before uploading your video, provide a filename, thumbnail, and subtitle/closed caption (CC) file with a relevant filename that contains your keywords. It is not the most important factor when we look at YouTube SEO, but even if it is a smaller ranking factor, you should include your keywords. It can be the deciding factor in the competition with other videos. Video quality also plays a role. It is important that the quality is good enough - preferably HD or above. Many cameras and cell phones today can film in such high quality that you can use the videos on YouTube. Title Title is the most important part of video optimization. You can use up to 100 characters and include your primary keyword as early as possible. Secondary keywords should also be used here, and they do not have to be an exact match. It is worth noting that if you stay below 70 characters, your title will not be truncated by YouTube. The most important thing for a title is that it makes the user curious and awakens some kind of emotion in her. A good example of an effective title is this one from REMA 1000.   Description Your video description must be unique and can hold up to 5,000 characters. We recommend you use them all. There may be some cases where YouTube determines your text is too long, even if you have not used all 5,000 characters. So always keep a few hundred characters below the maximum. In your description, you must describe what the user sees. Feel free to link to products and other videos so there is a natural next step in the description. Also, consider using questions to drive engagement. Be aware that less than 1% of viewers read the description. Even so, you should write in a natural language - not just an endless stream of keywords. It is a good idea to link to your other social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest etc., and encourage users on those sites to subscribe to your YouTube channel by providing a link. You should use your primary keyword more often than you would in a plain SEO text as keyword density still matters in YouTube. Video tags You can use up to 500 characters in your tags. Just like with the description, you should keep a few characters clear of the maximum, since YouTube does not always let you use the maximum number of characters. Tags should be based on your keyword research, video topic, relevant searches, etc. and are an important part of YouTube SEO. You should keep your tag strategy as tight as possible in terms of subject matter. Otherwise you end up confusing the algorithm. The image under Description earlier in this article also shows an example of tags for a video. It is the words on the right side of the picture. In this example, there are various flæskesteg (pork roast) keywords combined with sprød svær (crispy crackling) keywords. Thumbnails Thumbnails play a huge role in YouTube SEO. 90% of the best-performing videos have custom thumbnails. That is because they can multiply your CTR if used properly. YouTube makes it possible to select between three screenshots when uploading your video. However, you should always make a unique and custom one and it does not have to be from the video. Your thumbnail should: ·       Make a user want to click / watch the video ·       Be unique ·       Clearly tell / show what the video is about ·       Be consistent across channel and brand   These are two good examples of thumbnails. The first clearly shows the video is about flæskesteg (pork roast) in both the image and applied text. Typically, this will be the kind of thumbnail that works best. The second one is from a gamer, Welyn. It is a unique style to him and makes it easy for fans to spot his videos.   Subtitles - Closed Captions (CC) Subtitles help users know and understand your content, and they also help YouTube robots understand your content. While you must specify the language of the video, it is certainly possible to create your video in one language, for instance English, and have subtitles in different languages. You can add your own subtitles rather than relying on auto-generated subtitles which are not available in some languages. Because speech recognition is not working 100% yet, the quality may vary, so you should always check your subtitles. Use subtitles even if your video is in your audience’s native language. Bear in mind there are many who watch videos without audio. Therefore, subtitles are generally a good idea and they can be switched on/off in the video player if they are not hard-coded. Have you considered live streaming? YouTube is much more than pre-recorded videos. For example, you can also create live streams where you give your users new content while interacting with them directly. Live streaming does not require a large setup and you can live stream with a regular webcam or mobile device. Live streaming basics The most important thing is to use adequate technology. You will not be successful if your internet is too slow or there are problems with the software. As a rule of thumb, you must have the following internet speed if you want to achieve the following video qualities: ·       Standard Definition Video - 3 Mbps ·       720p and 1080p High Definition Video - 5-10 Mbps ·       4K Ultra High Definition Video - 25 Mbps   There are various encoder software products you can use for live streams. Several are verified by YouTube, and it may be beneficial to test a few of them before making your first live stream on YouTube.  The easiest way to live stream is to use a webcam - no encoder is needed for this. You can also live stream directly from your mobile from the YouTube app if you have more than 1,000 subscribers. With an encoder however, you have additional options that are not available for webcam or mobile streaming, including the option to use multiple cameras. Keep in mind that if you have not streamed before, it can significantly change the way your users view and interact with your content. You make it easier for them (and yourself) by clearly communicating future live streams (also on your other platforms) as well as letting them know, what the subject of the live stream. Live streaming is a golden opportunity to have a more meaningful interaction with your users. You can find answers to most YouTube live streaming questions on Google's support pages.   Use the integrated YouTube Studio analytics YouTube has its own analytics called YouTube Studio. Here you can see the reach, engagement, audiences, and revenue for the videos separately and for the channel overall. You can also see how users find you and how successful you are at converting them.   So dive into the analytics data to learn how your videos, playlists and channel perform. Get a YouTube SEO audit of your channel today If you already have a channel and would like to get started with YouTube SEO, it might be a good idea to have a channel audit first. That way you get a clear idea of where you are right now. When we perform a YouTube SEO audit, we look at videos, playlists, and the channel – the whole package. We then provide recommendations on how to optimise each part. If you need help with the optimizations themselves, we have many years of hands-on experience with YouTube. Contact us today to help you optimise your YouTube performance. 0

16 mins read

Make Your Google Tag Manager Setup Smarter

Make Your Google Tag Manager Setup Smarter

In this blog post we will discuss what a Google Tag Manager (GTM) is and how it is implemented. In addition, we focus on whether you need one Google Tag Manager for all your websites or one for each page. Finally, we will provide a tip on how to structure a global Google Tag Manager yourself. What is Google Tag Manager? Google Tag Manager is a free tool that helps marketers maintain and implement marketing pixels and tags on the website without having to enter and modify the source code. Google Tag Manager sends information from one data source (such as your website) directly to Google Analytics. By using Google Tag Manager, marketers can forego waiting for developers to implement pixels. How do I implement Google Tag Manager? Once you've created a Google Tag Manager, you'll see this under "Install Google Tag Manager." Google Tag Manager contains two scripts. One script should be at the top of <head> in your source code, the other should be at the top of <body> in the source code. If you would like to learn more about how to get a Tag Manager up and running, go to Google's implementation guide. Head tag A website typically contains a <head> section and a <body> section . The <head> section often includes styles, meta information, scripts, titles, etc. This is where we insert our external scripts, such as Google Tag Manager. The Google Tag Manager script looks like this: <! - Google Tag Manager -> <script> (function (W, D, S, L, I) {w [l] = W [L] || []; w [l] .push ({ 'gtm.start': new Date (). getTime (), event: 'gtm.js'}); var f = d.getElementsByTagName (s) [0], j = d.createElement (s), dl = l! = 'data layer'? '& l =' + l: ''; j.async = true; j.src = 'https://www.googletagmanager.com/gtm.js?id='+i+dl;f.parentNode.insertBefore(j,f); }) (window, document, "script", "dataLayer", "" Your Google Tag Manager ID ""); </script> <! - End Google Tag Manager -> This script places Google Tag Manager on the site. We recommend you place this as high in <head> as possible in the source code, as it ensures Google Tag Manager loads as quickly as possible. See also Google Tag Manager Quick Start Guide. NoScript tag NoScript is an alternative to the people (or robots/crawlers) who have disabled scripts in the browser or have a browser that does not support scripts. Google Tag Manager also has such a script and it should be placed at the top of your <body> tag. The script may look like this: <! - Google Tag Manager (noscript) -> <noscript> <iframe src = "https://www.googletagmanager.com/ns.html?id=GTM-" This Google Tag Manager ID "" height = "0" width = "0" style = "display: none; visibility: hidden"> </iframe> </noscript> <! - End Google Tag Manager (noscript) -> This NoScript tag does not really matter if you use Google Tag Manager exclusively to load JavaScript tags, marketing pixels, etc. However, if you are using Google Tag Manager to verify Google Search Console or Google Merchant Center for shopping ads, you will need to implement this directly after <body> in your source code. Otherwise, Google will not be able to verify your ownership. Templates in Google Tag Manager Google Tag Manager has a variety of templates you can use. But the only tag that is really supported if your users do choose to block scripts is the Custom Image Tag. The tag activates an iFrame, which includes the tracking. That is, if you have the <noscript> tag from Google Tag Manager installed and the user disables JavaScript in his browser, your existing Google Analytics templates will still not work. Few choose to block scripts, as many websites do not work at all without them. Google Tag Manager recommended structure There are several ways to set up a Google Tag Manager and it is important to mention that there is not one right way to do this. We see several different implementations across customers: • One Google Tag Manager per website (e.g., by country) • Several Google Tag Managers on subdomains • Global setups As a starting point, we will always recommend the last option, i.e., a global setup that you apply across your website. You can also use a global Google Tag Manager across multiple domains if you have more than one website. However, this does set some requirements for your websites. The pages must be identical in structure, otherwise, for example, you will not be able to apply your Google Analytics behaviour tracking across the websites unless you define it from the server using data layers. Why do we recommend one Google Tag Manager versus several Google Tag Managers? The short answer is time. The more Google Tag Managers you have, the harder it is to keep setups across all pages. It also becomes more difficult to secure your data across websites. Furthermore, each implementation will take longer if you, for example, must set up event tracking on an item across multiple markets. Sure, there are duplication tools where you can copy tags across Tag Managers, but it does not make sense in some implementations. The great thing about having one Global Tag Manager is that you can: • Secure your data • Quickly and easily onboard new markets and websites • Align your data structure across websites • Deploy once across websites How is this done in practice? Back in 2017, Google Tag Manager launched the Google Analytics Settings Variable. It made it easier to maintain one's Google Analytics setup by using a "master template" form on tags to integrate new custom dimensions and the like across all Google Analytics implementations. This set the stage for marketers to devise more intelligent setups in Google Tag Manager. In Google Tag Manager, there are endless possibilities for integrated and custom setups. In addition, there is also a template feature that serves as open source. So it can be difficult to determine your best setup options. Let's assume a scenario where we have five identical websites that we would like to track. We need to implement a complete tracking system with Enhanced Ecommerce, Facebook etc. The actual data layer structure is set up for the purpose of the scenario (based on Google's own Enhanced Ecommerce Developer Guide). In the past, you would probably consider making five individual tag implementations for each market. That may work, but if you run a larger Google Tag Manager setup, you end up with a lot of tags. The goal is to keep it simple and clear. In such a scenario, you can use Lookup Tables, a feature that allows you to identify a specific input and return a value based on it. We can then use the value to pass on data to unique Analytics tracking codes based on which website the customer is visiting. Here you can choose between Lookup Tables or Regex Tables. If we start from iProspect, it will look like this: iProspect uses subfolders in our URL (that is, we differentiate by individual markets, not the domain itself). Here we need a Regex Table to control where we send data and what data we send. The difference between the two is that LookUp Table requires an exact value in the pattern field, whereas Regex should be seen as a regular expression, where the URL contains patterns such as "/ en / dk /" that can be used to return a value based on the domain. That is, we can now use one tag to manage our Google Analytics, Facebook pixels and more across all markets. The great thing about this tool is that you can now easily onboard a new site by adding the new tracking code to the row (as shown in the image above), after which a duplicate setup of the other markets will move on to the new account. Can we help you with your Google Tag Manager? This is just one example how marketers can structure a Google Tag Manager setup more intelligently to quickly and easily launch a new website in a new market. Would you like to hear more about how we approach such a task? Contact us here. 0

7 mins read

Setting Up Your FB Retargeting Ads Funnel

Setting Up Your FB Retargeting Ads Funnel

Have you ever wondered whether you've set up your Facebook retargeting funnel in the right way? After all, you want to make sure you're taking advantage of all the website traffic you're receiving from your ad campaigns. By now, you should have already set up the Facebook pixel on the specific pages you need. And you should have already set up the right pixel events to fire when specific actions take place: landing page view, add to shopping cart, cart abandonment, initiate checkout, purchase, etc. and now you're ready for remarketing.  Setting up a retargeting funnel on Facebook is easy enough, but to be able to usher customers along their buying journey while ensuring they see the right message and offer takes experience and thoughtful planning. In this article, I'm going to show you the exact way you should be setting up your Facebook retargeting ads funnel. Exclude, exclude, exclude If you haven't done so already, you need to create a custom audience or audiences of the people who you want to exclude from your remarketing campaign. The most important thing for any facebook retargeting ads funnel is to exclude any custom audience who has already passed a certain part of your funnel, may not be the right fit for a certain category of products, or a customer list that don't need to see the advert again. You only want to target people who make sense to target.  For example, let's say you're running a 17-second video ad at the top of the sales funnel and retargeting anyone who has watched 95% or more of that video. Once a prospect has seen 95% or more of your video, you'll want to go into Facebook ads manager and exclude them from that ad set as they have already seen your video, and serving it to them again is a loss in ad spend that could be spent on a new prospect.   Instead of reshowing a video ad they have already seen, you may want to show them an offer to a product. If they then go on to buy that product, then unless it's an item you buy weekly, you'll want to exclude them from seeing any more ads as they have already bought the product. A Facebook retargeting campaign is all about taking a prospect from awareness to consideration to purchase. Once they go through to the next stage, there is no need for them to see content from the previous stage.  Having exclusions set up in your entire Facebook advertising retargeting funnel minimizes ad spend waste and keeps your prospects interested in your product or service because they do not see the same message over and over again. Think about your retention windows In ecommerce, each shopper has their own needs, wants, and objections about your product. For that reason, in facebook remarketing, your retention windows need to accommodate shopping behavior.  A retention window is the amount of time after visiting a website or viewing an ad that you retarget a potential customer for. For example, let's say you're selling yoga mats online and run Facebook ads. A sample retention window for website visitors may look something like this: 0-3 days after visiting your website – no offer, just an advert to buy your mat at full price 4-7 days after visiting your website – 10% off voucher off their first order 8-12 days after visiting your website – 15% off voucher off their first order 13-20 days after visiting your website – 20% off voucher off their first order plus free shipping Typically, if a Facebook user has landed on your website, they are a warm lead. They clicked on your ad and are now looking at your products.   If they are ready to buy at this point, they may not need an offer. This subset of users is usually only a small percentage of your remarketing audience; the majority will still be researching in their decision-making.  The further out they are in your retention window, the less likely it will be that they will re-visit your store as they'll forget or may not be so interested in your product. This is when offering a bigger promotion to those further out in your retention window will increase conversion rates.  In Facebook remarketing, the retention windows you use for your retargeting audience should be based on the ticket price of your items and your ad budget. For example, when buying small-ticket items like t-shirts and accessories (under $20), very few people spend weeks thinking about their decision. For these items, people who are in your retention window of 7-14 days would be your target audience. Larger ticket items (over $500), on the other hand, aren't impulsive buys, and often the buyer may need to consult others before making a purchase (husband or wife, business partner, work colleague, etc.). For these items, you would want to create longer retention windows and perhaps even add an extra layer to your funnel before pitching an offer. Your budget for your Facebook campaign also plays a role in your retention windows. For example, if you only have $2,000 per month to spend, then chances are you won't have the budget to run retention windows over 30 days.  On the other hand, if you're spending $50,000+ per month in your Facebook marketing campaign, then you may want to retarget people all the way up to 180 days.  There is no default model to follow with retention windows as they are unique to your product and service. Start by figuring out how long it takes the average customer to purchase from viewing your first ad and base your retention windows around that.  Creatives need to be fresh The more you spend on Facebook retargeting ads, the more creatives you'll need.  If your retention windows are 180 days, then when a prospect reaches the next facebook retargeting ads window and hasn't made your desired conversion action, you'll need to serve them unique creatives each time or otherwise, you'll fall victim to ad fatigue.  Having large retention windows but not enough creatives to fill them is a big leak I see in many Facebook retargeting funnels for businesses. Retargeting like a pro The secret to Facebook retargeting ads is to truly understand your customer journey. Ask yourself the following questions: On average, how long does it take to turn a prospect into a first time customer? If prospects aren't interested in your main offer, which secondary items are most popular? How often do customers reorder? Do prospects require further touchpoints in your funnel before being shown the main offer? Take an in-depth look at your Facebook retargeting ads funnel and see where you can make improvements to drive more sales. _____________________________ Original Post:  https://blog.mutesix.com/heres-the-exact-way-you-should-be-setting-up-your-fb-retargeting-ads-funnel   0

6 mins read

Amazon Attribution: Will it Answer Your Questions?

Amazon Attribution: Will it Answer Your Questions?

According to the 250 top marketers surveyed in the iProspect Global Client Survey, Amazon will be the third most influential tech company for their target audiences in 2020, after Google and Facebook. This is hardly a surprise considering the ever-growing importance of the platform in consumers’ daily lives. More than 78 million people in the United States alone already use Amazon on their mobile phones to compare prices or availability when shopping in a physical store (Dentsu proprietary data). For marketers, this situation comes with the critical challenge of correctly understanding the influence of their media efforts on Amazon sales to better drive their marketing investment. Until recently, Amazon hasn’t offered marketers the right tools to do so, but with the launch of Amazon Attribution, the e-commerce giant is actively working to close the gap with its competitors regarding marketing measurement solutions. Does the Amazon Attribution beta live up to its promise of better visibility on media performance? What are the benefits and limitations of the solution? To find out, iProspect specialists tested the solution on a leading apparel retailer in the United States, which is both an Amazon brand vendor and works with third-party sellers. Through the example of paid search, our specialists share what you should know before getting started with the beta. How Amazon Attribution Works What Amazon Attribution Solves The Amazon Attribution beta measurement solution aims to enable brands who sell on Amazon to better understand the impact of the digital media campaigns off Amazon (search ads, social ads, display ads, video ads and email) on their activity within Amazon. Let’s take the example of search ads (including Google Shopping ads): Anna searches for a product online in a search engine (i.e., outside Amazon), clicks an ad from brand X and lands on brand X’s website. After reviewing options, Anna may purchase on brand X's website, but may instead buy brand X's product on Amazon or perform additional research on Amazon. If she ends up buying on Amazon, it is clear the ad had an effect on her purchase, but without a proper attribution solution, it is impossible to demonstrate this indirect influence. This undermines the actual performance of search ads and limits brand X’s capacity to optimise its media dollars. This is exactly what Amazon Attribution addresses by providing brand X with sales impact analysis across media channels, so that brand X’s marketing team can now uncover the insights needed to optimise their campaigns and plan future activations.   Getting Started The two-step setup process is simple: Vendor brands and agencies work with their Amazon team to apply for the Amazon Attribution beta. Following the launch of the Amazon Attribution beta in 2018, Amazon expanded its availability in 2019, and the solution is now available both in the US and the UK (with limited access). The program has also expanded to include social campaign support. Teams should categorise reporting data and create pixels through orders in the Amazon interface accordingly. The media pixels are created for each publisher type and then added to specific campaigns or elements. For this test we created pixels based on search term categories and applied the pixels within tracking templates in Google’s Search Ads 360. This allowed Amazon to track clicks from Google search and shopping campaigns to Amazon detailed page views (DPV). What we found Three Considerations About Attribution and Performance (Results below combine data from first-party and third-party sellers on Amazon.) On average, 48% of clicks on Google search and Google shopping also tracked to DPVs on Amazon. Although DPV rate varied by campaign theme the fact that almost half of paid search clicks influenced DPV on Amazon on average demonstrates the importance of having all of your brand’s shopping experiences optimised. This indirect impact on Amazon casts a new light on the real performance of paid search and budget allocations within paid search programs. When factoring in paid search and shopping campaign influences, our .com campaign ROAS increased by 25%. Search engine campaigns to brand’s .com experience helps to influence potential customers before they go (or go back to) a platform like Amazon where they could easily buy from multiple or other brands. But particularly high DPV rates and conversion rates among certain segments helped us also re-evaluate our search campaign budgets to prioritise incrementality. Not surprisingly, the average order value (AOV) on Amazon was significantly lower than the client’s site, which has higher free-shipping thresholds and higher-end items.   Three Implementation and Measurement Implications Keep things simple at first: Marketers can add as many pixels/orders as they want, but they must consider how they will report and combine this information with the non-Amazon data. They should also keep track of precisely when they apply click pixels to media; not doing it all at one time can make the process of combining data rather complex. Keep in mind Amazon Attribution is still in beta: The program is subject to changes and Amazon may not be able to solve all questions or data discrepancies. Amazon changed the format of pixels from the initial launch into 2019. New publisher support may be added overtime with more specific pixels. Amazon has added new bulk features to streamline creation and implementation of pixels. Amazon Attribution tells what happens, not how: Although we uncovered a more robust picture of the shopping landscape, Amazon Attribution does not tell us how users get to Amazon after they click on a search text or shopping ad, for example, if they come to Amazon directly (i.e., typing the Amazon domain in the URL bar) and then convert, or if they land on Amazon via an Amazon ad in Google or an organic listing in Google. It also doesn’t confirm which products they buy on Amazon.   Additional Opportunities to Explore With the Beta Analyse performance over time if prices on your brand’s .com and Amazon experience are affected by promotions.  If you are using results from the beta to help guide budget shifts and allocations for your search and shopping campaigns, launch incrementality tests to validate learnings from the beta. For example, if we reduce coverage purposefully on a subset ofsearch campaigns that drove high conversion rate with the beta, would our brand’s Amazon experience pick up enough of the revenue loss so we can focus our budget on other search and shopping campaigns? Consider expanding pixel strategy to analyse performance by audience segments. Launch the beta across more than one media channel for your brand to better understand performance impact across your media mix.   Verdict Keeping in mind the current limitations, Amazon Attribution provides a great tool for brands to gain insights through Amazon sales impact analysis, develop in-flight optimisation strategies and plan future marketing activations across channels to maximise ROI and product sales. Needing guidance to implement Amazon Attribution for your brand or for other marketplace and retailer optimisation tactics? Contact global.marketing@iProspect.com today to explore opportunities. 0

6 mins read

At CES, Smart Products and Privacy Concerns Remain King

At CES, Smart Products and Privacy Concerns Remain King

Attending the Consumer Electronics Show is always an inspiring way to start a new year, let alone a new decade.  Major tech companies showcase their shiniest new products (and—let’s face it—concepts that will never make it to market).  Start-ups try to create buzz, sometimes with brilliant new solutions, but often with ideas that are simply bizarre.  Threaded throughout, the titans of Google and Amazon continue to integrate deeper across appliances, cars, and any other device that has evolved to be “smart.” After many hours spent meeting with companies and exploring the showroom floor, I came to the conclusion that this year’s event was a time of incremental evolution.  Sure, there was plenty of jaw-dropping tech on display—Samsung’s “The Wall” television was every bit as incredible as you’ve heard—but the overall sense I got was much different from past years.  It seems as though every major player is rethinking alliances and re-evaluating their position in the market, perhaps due to the arrival of CCPA (the California Consumer Privacy Act) and increasing consumer concerns over privacy. That’s not to say there were no fascinating trends at CES 2020. Below are my top five take-aways from both the showroom floor, and the conversations with key players throughout the week. The Smart Home Bandwagon:  Solutions in Search of a Problem Connected smart home products continue to be a big focus for brands exhibiting at CES.  Some solve for a specific need, like The Motion Pillow, a pillow gently adjusts head position when it detects snoring in order to improve airflow (and potentially improve marriages).  Some products are more like interesting novelties, like Kohler’s Smart Speaker showerhead.   Other products on the showroom floor feel more like a solution in search of a problem.  For example, the SimpleHuman smart trash can, which doesn’t sound like too bad of a proposition until you realize that it utilizes proprietary trash bags (which is either the “printer and ink” merchandising model or, if you’re feeling less generous, the Juicero approach).  Or if that’s not wacky enough, how about a $13,000 smart toilet?   Connected smart home devices will continue to be a major part of CES, but for many consumers the novelty of the basic concept has worn off a bit—meaning manufactures will have to level up their storytelling in order to truly demonstrate the value their products bring to everyday life. The Battle for the Smart Home Ecosystem In the spirit of the classic format wars of VHS vs Betamax and HD DVD vs Blu-Ray, Google and Amazon have been battling to stake a claim as the central hub for all the connected devices in a smart home.  In addition to those two titans, power users have a handful of other home connectivity options—but based on my personal experience, none of today’s solutions play nicely with the devices on the market today, let alone the new concepts showcased at CES. So, it’s fascinating to me that these companies (Google, Amazon, Apple (!!!), and more than ten others) have partnered to begin constructing a standard communications protocol to enhance device compatibility and cross-system integration.  This partnership is called Project Connected Home over IP (the unfortunate acronym “CHoIP”).  A universal standard would not only make smart home devices easier to set up and use by consumers, but since it is built on IP-based networking it would offer end-to-end security by default. However, CHoIP isn’t the only new solution on the horizon.  Smart home solution provider Z-Wave, a competitor to CHoIP partner ZigBee, is opening up their previously proprietary specifications to other chip manufacturers.  Many smart home products, including those by Amazon and Google Nest, already include Z-Wave radios as part of their connectivity.  Confusingly enough, Z-Wave’s parent company, Silicon Labs, is actually a participant in the CHoIP partnership. Lost yet?  Don’t worry—the space is incredibly confusing, primarily because unlike the format wars mentioned at the start of this section, this battle is over intangible network communication protocols, not physical media.  However CHoIP, Z-Wave, and other solutions wind up playing out, increased standardization of smart home connectivity is purely a good thing for consumers—and for the manufactures building products they want to sell (like, for example, that $13,000 toilet mentioned above). Surprising Exhibitors One of my favorite things to do at CES is keep an eye out for companies that seem like an odd fit for the showroom floor at the world’s largest tech conference.  Both Oral-B and Colgate unveiled new smart toothbrushes with features like detecting plaque in the mouth and connecting to your phone to track and coach good brushing habits.  AARP had a booth showcasing how they plan to use artificial intelligence to help improve elder care, but it felt very conceptual. Delta Airlines was the biggest surprise of the show for me.  Every time I stopped by, there was a long line outside their space, and inside they demonstrated a new smart display that tracks an individual’s location in a room and displays personalized information about their flight on a wall-mounted monitor.  The impressive part is that it does this for multiple individuals at a time, and each person sees only their information on the monitor, as it adjusts in real-time based on their movements—two people walking next to each other would see two totally different things on the monitor.  For a proof of concept product, it worked very well, and was even more impactful than the man outside the Delta booth demonstrating a powered exoskeleton that enables baggage handlers to move heavy luggage efficiently and without injury.  New Takes on Old Music Experiences As a musician, I’m always curious to see what the Roland Corporation brings to CES, and this year’s booth didn’t disappoint—a live band featured the latest electronic drums, digital amp modeling, and a “concept piano” that takes the mechanics of a traditional grand piano and wraps them in a futuristic package.Victrola showcased dozens of new takes on the classic turntable, integrating wireless connectivity into a record player with a variety of looks that were both classic and modern.  It was interesting to see how many other companies showcased record and cassette players with upgraded connectivity as well.  However, the most confusingly ubiquitous products scattered around the showroom floor were light-up speakers.  I saw at least a dozen of them at different booths, and outside of professional DJs looking to streamline their equipment cartage I’m not sure who the target audience for these strange devices is. The Looming Privacy Concerns Google didn’t have many gigantic announcements to make at CES this year, but one particular feature launch was quite telling.  Any time the Google assistant activates at a time when a user didn’t speak to it, users can now simply say “Google, that wasn’t for you.”  The Google Assistant will then apologize and delete the request from its history.Giving users this quick, real-time way to respond to smart devices triggering accidentally is a savvy move in a time when major tech companies are struggling to find the balance between privacy and personalized utility.  Over the next three years privacy is going to become one of the key differentiating features consumers look for when purchasing connected devices and choosing which framework to connect them through, yet privacy is one of the hardest features to showcase in the flashy way brands typically approach CES.  Throughout 2020 all of the major players will be navigating evolving legislation, but they should view adherence to the law as the minimum required action.  As our lives become even more interconnected with our devices, the companies that win will be those who actively showcase to their users that privacy is a priority, not just a legal requirement.  0

7 mins read

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