Results for

""

  • > All Sections
  • > News & Insights
Google's Response to Apple's New Intelligent Tracking Prevention

Google's Response to Apple's New Intelligent Tracking Prevention

Apple’s Intelligent Tracking Prevention Apple recently instituted a new tracking prevention measure in the newest release of Safari,  version 11. Their “Intelligent Tracking Prevention” (ITP) will cause any third-party cookies used for tracking users across sites to expire after 24 hours, and be expunged after 30 days. (Cookies used for logins are the only exception.) This impact will affect all digital marketers who measure conversions via cookie tracking. Specifically, search marketers will need to address conversion look-back windows. With Doubleclick and AdWords conversion tags considered third-party, any of the conversions they measure that take place more than 24 hours after the ad click will no longer be counted for searchers utilizing the Safari browser. Although this is a significant amount of traffic, the actual number of impacted conversions will be smaller and will vary by advertiser. According to StatCounter, Safari accounts for ~47% of mobile traffic in North America and ~10% on Desktop traffic as of August 2017. While the amount of traffic is initially concerning, the actual number of impacted conversions will be much smaller as it’s only conversions occurring within the first 24 hours after the click. Changes to Conversion Tracking in Adwords and Doubleclick Search Google is always concerned with user privacy, yet they also want to provide the most accurate measurement for advertisers. They have proactively addressed this tracking limitation by adding new functionality that estimates the number and amount of Safari conversions that are no longer counted.  As of September 20, this has been rolled out on Doubleclick Search (DS) and AdWords. In order to ensure that the conversion tracking will remain accurate, Google recommended a workaround to ensure that advertisers have Google Analytics tagged and running on their site, as well as Auto-Tagging enabled in their AdWords accounts. This recommended solution nullifies the tracking problem and ensures all conversions continue to be counted exactly as they have been historically. If your brand does not have Google Analytics tags on your site, both AdWords and Doubleclick Search will automatically estimate the untracked conversions and include these estimates in conversion total. Before estimates are factored in, Google will also be able to report conversions from those who have recently interacted with Google services and domains, which should reduce the amount of further estimates needed. Google reports that it will use machine learning and historical data to model the number of conversions, as well as the amount of conversion revenue that cannot be measured. The modeled conversions will be based off of historical data and will be active by default, with no universal opt-out feature for accounts. However, excluding the modeled conversions will be possible in both AdWords and DoubleClick Search, but will require adjustments to scheduled reports and reporting processes. There is established precedent for the math Google is using.  These estimations are created in the same way DS and AdWords handle cross-device conversions as a part of Google’s tried and true Total Conversions calculations. Nonetheless, it is a less seamless solution for brands that do not want to opt into Google Analytics, especially if other browsers follow in Apple’s footsteps in the coming years. As it stands, the initial impact is small, but search marketing was founded on the benefit of incredibly accurate measurement in near-real-time.  Even though Google’s calculations have extremely high confidence levels and have been validated many times, some advertisers will still feel uncomfortable with a shift to estimated results when they’ve been able to measure actual conversions for so long. What Marketers Should Do While not all brands will include these modeled conversions in their reporting, they should all should take steps to monitor the modeled conversions effectively in order to understand the degree to which these estimates make up their total conversions. iProspect recommends creating two columns for each conversion action the advertiser is tracking in AdWords or DS, and have one exclude the estimated conversions, while the other does not.  By creating an “old vs. new” conversion measurement view, advertisers will be able to accurately measure the actual impact of this change and validate Google’s estimates for the untracked conversions firsthand. Two things to consider while deciding whether to include these estimated conversions in reporting: If your brand is using any model for attribution aside from last-click, consider how these conversions will be impacted. Review how cross-device conversions are reported/leveraged in AdWords and/or DS right now. (The method of estimation for Safari conversions after 24 hours is very similar.  If an advertiser is already leveraging cross-device conversion numbers, they should feel completely comfortable with these new estimates.) As these changes continue to be rolled out through September, advertisers should stay observant of changes within each platform and then decide how to react. In addition, advertisers discuss this change in data and what it means for their brand specifically with their partners. Here at iProspect, we will be sure to keep you informed as this situation develops in the future.  0

Google just became Amazon's biggest competitor

Google just became Amazon's biggest competitor

Google is reinvigorating their marketplace product Buy on Google (formerly called Shopping Actions) by removing commission fees and giving control of the brand experience back to the hands of merchants. These updates represent a direct effort to compete with Amazon and evolve Google’s online shopping experience at a time when people are shopping online more than ever due to COVID-19 closing down physical stores and altering consumer habits.   The announcement made last week highlighted several major changes. Google showcased new payment service platform partnerships with PayPal and Shopify and also expanded data feed integrations within Merchant Center. Google also passed back responsibility to brands for managing customer support, shipping, and returns. Finally, Google has even created a solution which builds feeds directly from Google’s own database.   Buy on Google will disrupt small and large retailers.  A streamlined checkout process has several highlights that are covered in a bit more detail below. 0% commission fees: This is a major change which will encourage all retailers to rethink their Buy on Google strategy.  A comparison that highlights the magnitude of this change:  Previous commission rates on Shopping Actions for apparel product categories was 12%! Updated merchant and financial requirements: The requirements to sell on Shopping Actions are now gone and Google is pulling out all the stops to remove excuses for brands to not onboard. Marketers no longer need a US bank account after linking to GMC with an approved payment service platform account (PayPal and Shopify, to start with). Barriers of entry have been removed: Google has relinquished complete control of payment transactions, managing customer support, as well as returns & shipping. Returning ownership of important brand-owned processes back to the retailer shows that Google is confident in brands meeting customer expectations for purchases made on Google Shopping. Product feed integrations: Google Merchant Center is supporting non-Google product feed uploads, by their greatest ecommerce and marketplace competitor - Amazon. Focus on supporting small businesses: Consumers will soon be able to filter and view products sold by small business merchants specifically.   What was missing in the announcement Google has been slowly rolling out new features and updates over the past several months around other organic and unpaid feed-powered listings. Retailers activating on the Buy on Google program can also opt-in at the same time to these free Google products listings called Surfaces Across Google. The same product feed powers both programs so merchants not only have commissions removed for Google’s marketplace but their catalog will now serve across multiple shopping experiences without paid media.  We predict that in the near future to see Buy on Google checkout options begin to show on organic search results, such as on the Knowledge Graph - a previously paid ad listing placement. While this experience is what we expect next, the details still follow suit on aggregating paid and free product listings to their specific ad placements across Google properties. Shopping Actions:  A solution in search of a problem...until now The Google marketplace (Shopping Actions) has struggled to burst through the bubble of mass adoption by merchants with spending the last seven years expanding and rebranding the program. The removal of commission fees is a unique value proposition and explicit advantage against marketplace rivals like Walmart and Amazon, but also a deep benefit for small businesses that started digital ecommerce on eBay and Etsy. The payment system partnerships have made up for years of minimal merchant integrations. To compensate and attempt to counter Amazon’s two million+ small businesses already selling on that marketplace, Google chose to integrate the Amazon catalog into Google Merchant Center. This has never happened in the history of Google and is unprecedented. What Google now has is a data set of product information far more robust than their own catalog. Shopify has a small business customer base of one million (and growing) on the platform which now brings a larger assortment of products, and new small businesses that have minimal reason to not now sell on Google marketplace. What does this mean for your business? Brands who have refused to launch on marketplaces like Amazon now have minimal hesitation to begin selling on Google. Nike has refused to sell on Amazon for some time due to not being able to own the customer experience. Brands should focus on evaluating their media plan and product feed strategy. This would entail identifying product lines, seasonality SKUs, and less profitable products to be specifically assigned as eligible to serve in a marketplace, organic/unpaid listings or paid campaigns. This granular setup is especially important due to limited reporting features and forecasting features within the Google Merchant Center--feature gaps which will hopefully be addressed by Google in the future. Google is placing a strategic bet on small businesses to lean into their marketplace by removing commission fees and reducing barriers to entry. These changes were driven by Google’s Bill Ready, a former PayPal executive, executive leader at Braintree & Venmo, and supporter of small business commerce for over a decade. When it comes to steering a ship such as Google marketplace in a new direction, his vision shows the understanding of how small businesses are driving the future of marketplace commerce. However, even if the primary focus of these changes appears to be small businesses, if large brands don’t take the time to review their current Google Shopping approach and leverage these new features, they will be the ones missing out on a major commerce opportunity during this coming holiday season. 0

What iProspect’s Mentorship Program Taught Me About Informal Leadership

What iProspect’s Mentorship Program Taught Me About Informal Leadership

When I joined iProspect, I was an Associate Project Manager with just a couple of years of professional experience. My previous company was much smaller than iProspect, and frankly, I was overwhelmed at first by the more complex processes of a larger organization. While iProspect had (and still has) an excellent training program for new employees, there were still some gaps: where can I find our employee handbook, who do I talk to about getting a key fob, and most importantly, what’s the best lunch spot around? So, I was delighted when I heard that iProspect was launching a mentorship program with the aims of helping new employees get settled and guiding more senior employees in developing their careers. iProspect introduced their mentorship program in October of 2017, which put them in good company; according to the Wall Street Journal, “about 70% of Fortune 500 companies offer mentoring programs.” The program currently features three tracks: iStart (for new hires) iConnect (for inter-department collaboration and growth), and iProsper (for managers and directors hoping to further develop their careers). As of Q2 2018, over 170 participants have completed one of the mentorship tracks or are currently enrolled. I’ve personally mentored four colleagues so far and have learned a lot about expectation-setting, accountability and flexibility.  Setting Expectations   When establishing a mentoring relationship, it’s important to set expectations up front. Mentees should have one to two goals outlined at the start of the relationship. (Ideally, these goals will be in the SMART format). In one case, I helped my mentee determine their initial goals, based on their broad ideas of how they could improve some of their professional skills. Additionally, creating ground rules can provide a shared sense of purpose for both the mentee and the mentor. These ground rules can cover meeting frequency, roles and responsibilities and communication format, to name a few. A successful mentorship relationship is based on a solid framework, which is created early by setting clear expectations.   Accountability Accountability is not just about one person keeping tabs on another – it’s a two-way street. As Mary Teresa Bitti wrote in her article in the Financial Post, “Mentoring is two-way learning. The mentor learns to improve on the skill of developing others, while you as the mentee benefit from their experience and wisdom.” As a mentor, I’m accountable to my mentee to come to meetings prepared, to listen thoughtfully (no multi-tasking during meetings) and to help support my mentee in reaching their goals. Being accountable to my mentee motivated me to give them my best; after all, they’re counting on me to give them thoughtful advice! Mentees, in turn, must drive the agenda and be open to suggestions for improvement. The dual accountability provides motivation to both parties to follow through on their commitments, which in turn enables growth.   Flexibility    The mentor/mentee relationship is unique in the workplace; it’s neither a formal reporting flow nor a casual acquaintance. This distinction is important because it allows for more freedom and safety than a manager/employee relationship, but more structure than mere colleagues or office buddies. Because of this unique structure, I quickly realized the importance of flexibility in my approach. Some mentees respond better to open-ended suggestions and free-flowing conversations, while others prefer a more direct approach. According to an article from Chronus, when setting up a mentorship program, “flexibility is essential to support varying individual mentoring needs across specific learning goals, preferences, and learning styles.”   A successful mentorship can be achieved by ensuring that expectations are clear from the outset, making sure each party is accountable to the other, and by allowing space for flexibility. As I reflect on what I’ve learned from working with my first few mentees, I’m excited to continue my own professional growth via our mentorship program – maybe even as a mentee next time! 0

Optimisation of Checkout Flow on the Mobile

Optimisation of Checkout Flow on the Mobile

Want to improve your website's checkout flow on your mobile in order to increase your conversions? 9 out of 10 Danish webshops miss sales.   By focusing more on your users' experience through the flow, it is possible. In this blog post, you will get some pointers on what a good user experience (UX) is on mobile and how you can improve your checkout flow on mobile with a focus on UX.   What is good UX on mobile - and what is not? There are several different definitions of what good UX is. However, the core definition centers around meeting the specific needs of users in specific contexts. By focusing on mobile, you will also be ready for Mobile-First indexing.   When we talk about good UX for mobile, there are some best practices that are an important part of the design process, such as: ·       Prioritise the user ·       Make the navigation intuitive ·       Focus on the user's goals ·       Make the user’s tasks easy to do ·       Build speed into the UX ·       Give feedback to the user ·       Minimise the amount of extra information ·       Layout the design according to the user's hand (see image below)       By having these best practices in mind, you can create a better user experience for users who either visit your home page via mobile or app. Remember that the future of search is about one overall user experience.   How do I create a better checkout flow? Buy-ready users often leave the checkout flow because they experience some form of frustration during the buying process, giving them a poor user experience. Below are some best practices for how you can minimise the users’ feeling of frustration in the checkout flow and thereby give them a better user experience. Getting started with conversion optimization is easy.   Visualise the curve It should be easy and clear for the user to understand and control what is in his/her basket. A rule of thumb is that the user must have clarity about the product, which includes product images and information, such as price and delivery costs. In addition, the user should have the feeling of control when it comes to making changes to the curve. Therefore, the user must be able to update the number, colors, size, etc. as well as remove products from the basket.   Save for later The Save for later feature can be an important factor in the checkout flow, as it allows users to save a product on the page itself and come back to buy it later. Some users assume that websites or apps automatically store the information in the basket, which can create great frustration when they return and discover the basket is empty. Delivery information Filling out a long form is both time consuming and can result in errors and frustrations among users. Therefore, minimise the number of fields to make it easy and fast for users to enter their information. Another thing you can do to optimise the process here is to insert a field with the option to use shipping address as billing address. This eliminates the need for users to enter the same information twice. Auto-fill and error One of the primary purposes of auto-fill is to make it easier and faster for users to fill out a form. At the same time, auto-fill reduces the risk of user error which creates a better user experience. There are several different types of auto-fill options, such as filling in delivery information or finding an address by entering a postcode. Should it happen that a user enters information that contains an error, it is important that the user receives feedback on this. This could be, for example, if the user has entered his telephone number with a 7 or 9 number instead of 8. Then it must be clear in the form where the error is, so that the user can easily and quickly correct the error. The feedback that helps the user detect the error provides a better experience as the user can quickly and easily locate and correct the error. Order overview In the order overview, it is important that the structure of the information is organised in a way that will help streamline the users' checkout. Therefore, the shipping address should be at the top where users have the option to change it. Then the number of products and their details should be displayed to avoid the user going back in the process to make sure that they are the right products. Discounts, delivery costs, VAT and the total price should also be included in the order overview. This way, you avoid an unexpected cost for users later in the process, which prevents them from converting. Payment methods For many users, entering card information on their mobile phone can be cross-border and time consuming. Therefore, you can create a better user experience by offering different payment methods - including the ability to use MobilePay. That way, users avoid entering card information, and some users perceive the method as more secure compared to entering it directly on the website. Another way to create a great user experience is by displaying security and verification images in the payment step. It gives users a sense of confidence and security in the checkout flow.     Purchase confirmation Last but not least, a purchase confirmation contributes to a good user experience, as users now know that the transaction has been completed and a confirmation email has been sent. There are several elements you can consider including in the purchase confirmation to create an even better user experience. For example, you might add an image or illustration that clearly shows the purchase has been completed. Here, users get a sense of a successful checkout process and confirmation  they completed their goal, namely, to buy a product. How do I know if it works? As mentioned earlier, good UX is characterised by meeting the specific needs of the users in specific contexts. The optimizations that are meet your users’ needs and work for your business may not work for another business and their users. It is important to be clear about what your optimizations should improve. The easiest way to do this is to set up different KPIs. With a KPI framework, you always have an overview of what to measure and how it goes. Although the previous sections provide examples of best practices in UX optimization of a checkout flow on mobile, it is not possible to know in advance whether the optimizations you make on your website or app will work with your users. Therefore, it will be important to perform A / B split tests of the optimizations before they are implemented. Here, the different versions are tested against each other, making it possible for you to find out whether the optimizations perform in your checkout flow or not before they are implemented. You should never implement anything without testing it first.   Need help getting started?   You are always welcome to contact us if you want to hear more about how we can help you optimise your checkout flow and UX. We are happy to help you get started, so that together we can create a digital success that drives business performance. 0