Linsey Loy, selected as one of Business Insiders’ 50 Rising Stars of Madison Avenue

Linsey Loy, selected as one of Business Insiders’ 50 Rising Stars of Madison Avenue

Linsey Loy, SVP and Head of Growth for iProspect, has been selected as one of Business Insiders’ 50 Rising Stars of Madison Avenue who are revolutionizing advertising in 2021!

2 mins read

Danielle Gonzales Joins iProspect as Its First North America CEO

Danielle Gonzales Joins iProspect as Its First North America CEO

NEW YORK, NY — October 5, 2021 -- iProspect, a dentsu company, announced today that it has appointed Danielle Gonzales as its first North America CEO. In this new role, Danielle will guide over 1,000 specialists across the US and Canada, leading a unified team in elevating the agency’s end-to-end capabilities to accelerate growth through a performance mindset. Danielle will report to Doug Rozen, CEO, dentsu Media – Americas and become a member of the dentsu Media Americas executive team. With a deep knowledge of changing consumer behaviors, innovative media connections, and data-driven storytelling, Danielle is known for how she redefines media approaches that push business outcomes. Danielle joins iProspect from Publicis Groupe, where she was recently elevated to President and Chief Client Officer of Publicis Media North America. Before that she was President and Chief Client Officer at Starcom, where she led North America and global client partnerships for KraftHeinz, McDonald’s, and BeamSuntory across Publicis Groupe’s media, communications, data, and tech teams. With over 25 years of industry experience, Danielle has helped transform clients’ marketing and communications connections from siloed to complete consumer experiences.  Before her leadership positions at Starcom, she led the largest multicultural media agency Tapestry for more than a decade. At Tapestry, Danielle successfully grew the business by double digits for five consecutive years. Doug Rozen, CEO, dentsu Media Americas said: “Danielle is a get it done, master practitioner that truly knows the how, the what, and the why -- which allows her to push the status quo and stay ahead of what’s next. Her ability to understand the radical shifts in media and develop client friendships beyond just a professional relationship is exactly what the new iProspect requires to capitalize on their impressive full suite of services. Danielle brings a leadership style of boldness and empowerment that not only champions systematic change, but creates an inclusive environment for our people, clients, and partners.” Danielle is also a well-recognized industry leader, having been named Ad Age’s Women to Watch, Adweek’s Media All-Star, and HispanicAd.com’s Media Planning Executive of the Year in recent years. On joining iProspect, Danielle commented: “The next evolution of marketing involves improving performance at every bend of the consumer journey, and iProspect’s unmatched expertise and craftsmanship makes them unstoppable. I’ve seen first-hand the power of product and the value it brings to global brands and iProspect is perfectly positioned as the agency to not only accelerate growth for those brands, but also make a distinct impact on the industry. I’m excited to lead this forward-thinking team focused on delivering real outcomes.” Amanda Morrissey, Global President, iProspect added: “iProspect is the agency designed to deliver more effective growth across the entire media spectrum through the intersection of brand and demand. Danielle’s fierce ability to know consumers and their needs will play an integral role in shaping iProspect’s unique culture and client relationships.” Danielle joins iProspect at a transformative moment, recently launching into a game-changing digital-first end-to-end media agency. iProspect was also chosen as a global strategic media partner for LinkedIn anchored out of the US, and named the agency to handle Cox Communications US ad planning and buying business. In addition, it has won numerous accolades at industry events this year, including the Cannes Lions Festival of Creativity. Original article on Adweek   Danielle Gonzales joins iProspect as its first North America CEO NEW YORK, NY — October 5, 2021 -- iProspect, a dentsu company, announced today that it has appointed Danielle Gonzales as its first North America CEO. In this new role, Danielle will guide over 1,000 specialists across the US and Canada, leading a unified team in elevating the agency’s end-to-end capabilities to accelerate growth through a performance mindset. Danielle will report to Doug Rozen, CEO, dentsu Media – Americas and become a member of the dentsu Media Americas executive team. With a deep knowledge of changing consumer behaviors, innovative media connections, and data-driven storytelling, Danielle is known for how she redefines media approaches that push business outcomes. Danielle joins iProspect from Publicis Groupe, where she was recently elevated to President and Chief Client Officer of Publicis Media North America. Before that she was President and Chief Client Officer at Starcom, where she led North America and global client partnerships for KraftHeinz, McDonald’s, and BeamSuntory across Publicis Groupe’s media, communications, data, and tech teams. With over 25 years of industry experience, Danielle has helped transform clients’ marketing and communications connections from siloed to complete consumer experiences.  Before her leadership positions at Starcom, she led the largest multicultural media agency Tapestry for more than a decade. At Tapestry, Danielle successfully grew the business by double digits for five consecutive years. Doug Rozen, CEO, dentsu Media Americas said: “Danielle is a get it done, master practitioner that truly knows the how, the what, and the why -- which allows her to push the status quo and stay ahead of what’s next. Her ability to understand the radical shifts in media and develop client friendships beyond just a professional relationship is exactly what the new iProspect requires to capitalize on their impressive full suite of services. Danielle brings a leadership style of boldness and empowerment that not only champions systematic change, but creates an inclusive environment for our people, clients, and partners.” Danielle is also a well-recognized industry leader, having been named Ad Age’s Women to Watch, Adweek’s Media All-Star, and HispanicAd.com’s Media Planning Executive of the Year in recent years. On joining iProspect, Danielle commented: “The next evolution of marketing involves improving performance at every bend of the consumer journey, and iProspect’s unmatched expertise and craftsmanship makes them unstoppable. I’ve seen first-hand the power of product and the value it brings to global brands and iProspect is perfectly positioned as the agency to not only accelerate growth for those brands, but also make a distinct impact on the industry. I’m excited to lead this forward-thinking team focused on delivering real outcomes.” Amanda Morrissey, Global President, iProspect added: “iProspect is the agency designed to deliver more effective growth across the entire media spectrum through the intersection of brand and demand. Danielle’s fierce ability to know consumers and their needs will play an integral role in shaping iProspect’s unique culture and client relationships.” Danielle joins iProspect at a transformative moment, recently launching into a game-changing digital-first end-to-end media agency. iProspect was also chosen as a global strategic media partner for LinkedIn anchored out of the US, and named the agency to handle Cox Communications US ad planning and buying business. In addition, it has won numerous accolades at industry events this year, including the Cannes Lions Festival of Creativity. Original article on Adweek   0

6 mins read

A Cookieless World Conclusion

A Cookieless World Conclusion

As 87% of people now believe data privacy is a right, not a privilege,[1]we, as marketers, should do better to address their growing concerns around how their information is collected and used. It is not only a matter of legal compliance, but also a matter of trust.  In that context, although the recent evolution in the cookies landscape has triggered legitimate concerns around the potential consequences on advertising efficiency and on market dynamics, we should all welcome any change promoting user privacy as a collective, meaningful progress.  Of course, these changes come with their own set of challenges and uncertainties, and the industry will probably have to make do with less - but better - data.  As we have seen in this report:  The leading web browsers are moving away from third-party cookies, creating a fresh paradigm for the digital marketing industry. In 2023, we consider using third-party cookies for advertising purposes should be a relic of the past. Apple is going even further, requiring apps to explicitly obtain consent to keep tracking users.[2] Some digital marketing activities are impacted, such as data management, audience activation, and performance measurement.  Marketers must reconsider how they manage data. This means questioning their current value exchange, improving communications around data privacy, and revisiting their technology needs.  To keep engaging consumers, marketers should investigate the possibilities offered by contextual targeting and cookieless audience targeting alternatives such as persistent IDs.  To measure future performance, marketers will have to combine multiple techniques, from in-platform attribution to incrementality measurement to media mix modelling. A solid testing roadmap will be more important than ever.  There is no silver bullet for this evolution, instead, each brand must develop its unique combination of responses. It is fine if your organisation has not figured out the best option yet. You are not running behind as there is still time to adapt – but you should not wait any longer to plan your transition to a new model.  We expect discussions around privacy and identity to stay at the forefront of the debate even after we have pivoted to the cookieless world.  This is why at dentsu we constantly monitor the martech landscape and are committed to working alongside our clients and partners to imagine and implement solutions that work for all. As a global leader in search marketing, we have implemented advanced cookieless strategies for the world’s largest brands for the last 10+ years. We are using this know-how to help our clients not only thrive in a world free of third-party cookies but do so with speed.  Digital advertising has always been one of the most dynamic and exciting marketing spaces - and we are confident the best is yet to come.    For more, download the full report today: http://ow.ly/KDTK50FKTaJ  [1] Microsoft Advertising in partnership with iProspect, 2020 Consumer Privacy and Brand Trust Survey, Dec 2019 – Mar 2020, as featured in the report In Brands We Trust, published in April 2020  [2] Apple Developer, App Store, User Privacy and Data Use, as accessed on May 4, 2020    0

3 mins read

Data Management

Data Management

More Than Just Technology   When we think about data management, we can be tempted to jump to the question “How do we do it?” which leads to a conversation around technology. Although this conversation is necessary, it is not sufficient to build a solid strategy. Why we collect the data (i.e., the specific purpose of this data in both the pursuit of business objectives and the improvement of consumer experience), and What data we collect (i.e., what data is really useful) are critical.    The answers to the Why and What questions directly influence the How. They enlighten our tech investment decisions (e.g., infrastructure, partnerships) by helping refine our needs. We also know that people can decline to share their data or even game the system when they deem the reasons for data collection are not legitimate: 88% of them have already either refused to give or provided false personal information.[i]Additionally, sitting on data that has no potential for activation because it does not address a specific objective or it does not contain valid user information increases costs without contributing to growth and profits.    The transition to a cookieless world is the perfect time for brands to ensure they define clear answers to the Why, What and How of their data management strategy.     Three considerations for efficient data management        1. Define the right value exchange    Finding the right balance in the data value exchange is no easy feat. According to the dentsu Digital Society Index, a third of people (32%) globally have opted out of receiving personalised ads in the last 12 months. [ii]   Additional research shows that marketers generally tend to overestimate the value of the benefits they provide. Half (49%) believe they offer a fair exchange to consumers for the value of their data, [iii]while only 37% of consumers agree. [iv]   However, as illustrated in the opposite table, marketers tend to underestimate consumers’ motivations to share their data. Interestingly, only 9% of marketers believe helping a company improve products or services is an incentive for consumers, while 44% of consumers believe so.    These disconnections can create a perceived imbalance in the value exchange, which can result in distrust from consumers or missed opportunities for brands. For that reason, it is important for brands to develop a clear understanding of the specific factors influencing their audiences’ attitudes and behaviours around privacy, and to build upon these insights to adjust the value exchange they propose to consumers.    Use Case #1:  Invest in research to understand your perceived value exchange    User surveys and interviews can help you appreciate how audiences see your brand regarding privacy issues and to understand their expectations when sharing data with you. These insights are useful to define the best approaches for which your audiences would see an interest in logging in your website (e.g., rewards, gamification, product registration) – and, as a result, to build and nurture robust sources of first-party data.    Use Case #2:  Tap into media consumption to identify opportunities for data partnerships    An in-depth analysis of your audiences’ media consumption can help you identify relevant publishers to partner with to access complementary data. We expect these second-party data partnerships to increase as companies look to build comprehensive portraits of their consumers while decreasing their reliance on third-party data sources.        2. Invest in user education and transparent communications   With two thirds of consumers (67%) having little to no understanding about how their data is used by companies,[v]brands that proactively reach out to customers about how they approach privacy can help alleviate concerns, explain the value they deliver in exchange for data, and seize the opportunity to differentiate from the competition by positioning themselves as trusted partners.    Use Case #1:  Explaining privacy / cookie policies    As only 22% of consumers declare they always read privacy policies,[vi]regularly educating your customers about your privacy practices in clear and concise language can demonstrate greater attention to consumer privacy needs compared to competitors only reaching out sporadically and in legal jargon when they update their policies or when a data breach happens.  For example, this might include providing information in layers (with the most valuable information being provided in the initial layers), just-in-time notices, or using icons that convey important information (e.g., a bar graph icon in front of a description of analytics cookies).    Use Case #2:  Making the case for opt-in    iOS 14.5 has officially been launched by Apple. After installing the update, an iPhone user opening an app is shown a popup notification asking the user to explicitly opt in to data tracking.  Apple authorises application developers to explain to users why they would like permission to track before the prompt is shown. We encourage brands to make the most of this opportunity to explain the value they can provide in exchange for collecting data.  However, there are strict guidelines to follow, and any incentive scheme or tactic to trick users into allowing tracking is against the App Store Review Guidelines39 and should be avoided.  This is an excellent example of why proactively building trust is more important than ever—the brands that have been building this trust with consumers prior to launch are in a more advantageous position than those only addressing the issue after the update went live.   Use Case #3:  Improving user experience for privacy    A good user experience builds the trust needed for users to opt in and consent to marketing activities. Low consent rates are not necessarily due to a perceived lack of value in the exchange proposed by the brand, they could also be simply due to a poor user experience.  So long as first-party cookies exist, so will cookie notifications - and cookie pop-up and banners are not created equally. These notifications should not be treated as afterthoughts and should be carefully handled by both legal and UX teams to ensure consent is properly collected and that the user choices are presently clearly and compliantly with legal requirements.        3. Adapt your technology infrastructure    The third key consideration for efficient data management is selecting and optimising the right piece of technology. The perfect out-of-the-box stack does not exist – it is all about each organisation’s needs, objectives, and operational capabilities. Many technology suppliers offer interesting solutions to support a cookieless future, such as Salesforce or Adobe. As a matter of simplicity, we will use Google’s solutions, which are prevalent among many organisations, as an illustration of how to reduce immediate reliance on third- party cookies.    Fundamental #1:  Evolve your current tag setup    It is important that your tag setup is able to measure conversions even without third-party cookies. This means shifting to first-party cookies and identifiers, whether client-side or server-side. Client-side tagging solutions (i.e., living on the browser) are the easiest ones to implement on the short term, as this can be done through a tag management platform (e.g., Google Tag Manager). On the long term, server-side tagging solutions (i.e., living in the cloud) offer more durability and control, as you can leverage and customise them across partners. However, they require significantly more time and financial investment.    Fundamental #2:  Ensure you can differentiate tracking according to user consent    If you are not already using a Consent Management Platform, this addition to your tech stack is worth considering to help your organisation process user content on-site in a compliant way. You also need to configure your tags to automatically adjust tracking for activation and performance measurement according to the user’s consent or withheld consent:    • For users who consent, first-party cookies can be used to track the user journey and conversions.    • For users who do not consent, tracking cannot be deployed, and conversions must be modelled. To do so, several solutions are available to you. For instance, Google Analytics can integrate with IAB Europe’s Transparency and Consent Framework v2.0 to adjust tags. Another available option is to use Google’s Consent Mode to pass consent signals across the Google stack (e.g., Google Display & Video 360).    You also need to remember that many privacy laws around the world require that once a user has consented to the use of cookies, they have the right to withdraw that consent. Consequently, you need to ensure that your chosen Consent Management Platform (or equivalent solution) allows users to easily withdraw consent or indicate their cookie preferences. In practice, for example, this may be achieved by having a "cookie" or "privacy" icon that continuously hovers at the bottom of a user's screen, which if clicked takes the user to a cookie preference window where the user can toggle specific cookies "on" or "off".    Fundamental #3:  Implement the foundational technology to prevent gaps    Google also offers many solutions to prevent gaps in measurement. Enhanced Conversions use hashed first- party customer data rather than relying on cookies or IDFAs. Conversion modelling through Consent Mode uses machine learning to model non-consenting conversions based on observable data. Google Analytics 4’s Enhanced measurement can also track engagements which were once difficult to monitor (e.g., video plays and exit link clicks). When using Google, we recommend marketers experiment with the different features offered by the platform - even when only available in beta – and to upgrade to Google Analytics 4 to maximise the full potential of their Google partnership.      For more, download the full report today: http://ow.ly/KDTK50FKTaJ      [i] Microsoft Advertising in partnership with iProspect, 2020 Consumer Privacy and Brand Trust Survey, Dec 2019 – Mar 2020, as featured in the report In Brands We Trust, published in April 2020 [ii] Dentsu, Decoding Data Dynamics: Digital Society Index 2020, Global survey of 32,000 respondents [iii] iProspect, iProspect 2020 Global Client Survey, October 2020  [iv] Microsoft Advertising and iProspect, Consumer Privacy and Data Survey Dec 2019 – Mar 2020, as featured in the report In Brands We Trust, published in April 2020  [v] Microsoft Advertising and iProspect, Consumer Privacy and Data Survey Dec 2019 – Mar 2020, as featured in the report In Brands We Trust, published in April 2020 [vi] Microsoft Advertising and iProspect, Consumer Privacy and Data Survey Dec 2019 – Mar 2020, as featured in the report In Brands We Trust, published in April 2020    0

9 mins read

The Beginning of A New Era

The Beginning of A New Era

The global demand for privacy is one of the most consequential consumer dynamics at play today.   Across the globe, 91% of consumers are concerned about the amount of data that companies can collect about them, [i] and 42% have taken steps to reduce the amount of data they share online.[ii]   In light of this desire for increased privacy, most technology platforms have recently implemented or announced restrictions around data collection and user tracking through their web browsers and operating systems.   For brands and the advertising industry, the magnitude of this evolution is massive.   On the short term, it is undoubtedly a source of conundrums for many marketers and publishers. Processes, ways of workings, legal compliance efforts, technology stacks, customer data strategies – even business models – must be reviewed and rethought to limit business disruption.   Yet, in the long term, it offers a unique opportunity to (re)build trust between brands and consumers around the data issue. Success will hinge on increasing efforts to educate audiences (67% of consumers declare they have little to no understanding about how their data is being used[iii]) and defining a right value exchange that works for all (only 15% of consumers feel they are getting a good value from granting access to their data[iv]).   In the midst of sensationalist headlines, technical solutions still being worked out, and a lack of shared standards to get behind, it is normal for marketers to feel lost and nervous. In a recent marketer survey we conducted, 60% of respondents declared they are not familiar with tracking prevention or are unsure about the consequences on their business, showing that this fast-changing landscape is not fully understood yet.[v]   In this new dentsu definitive guide for global marketers, The Cookieless World, we rise above unique market perspectives and cut through the ambient noise to help you focus on what you should know today and investigate tomorrow to be ready in 2023, when the world will become cookieless.   For more, download the full report today: http://ow.ly/KDTK50FKTaJ    [i] Microsoft Advertising in partnership with iProspect, 2020 Consumer Privacy and Brand Trust Survey, Dec 2019 – Mar 2020, as featured in the report In Brands We Trust, published in April 2020   [ii] Dentsu, Decoding Data Dynamics: Digital Society Index 2020, Global survey of 32,000 respondents   [iii] MMicrosoft Advertising in partnership with iProspect, 2020 Consumer Privacy and Brand Trust Survey, Dec 2019 – Mar 2020, as featured in the report In Brands We Trust, published in April 2020   [iv] Microsoft Advertising in partnership with iProspect, 2020 Consumer Privacy and Brand Trust Survey, Dec 2019 – Mar 2020, as featured in the report In Brands We Trust, published in April 2020   [v] iProspect, iProspect 2020 Global Client Survey, November 2020, as featured in Future Focus 2021: Brands Accelerated, published in April 2021 0

3 mins read

Making the most of Attention by Aligning UX with Consumer Intent.

Making the most of Attention by Aligning UX with Consumer Intent.

This article is authored by Chris Philp, VP, Lead, SEO and Karen Kysar, Senior Director CX Strategy.    Advertising campaigns are not the only ways for brands to get consumers’ attention. Guiding them when they search for information, helping them to learn more about a topic, and assisting them in accomplishing what they want are powerful means for brands to capture their interest and to influence what happens next.   To design valuable, consumer-centric experiences that will be noticed by their audiences, marketers should focus on three priorities: correctly interpreting intent, solving users’ problems and delivering on expectations.   Understand intent Correctly interpreting intent is not just about observing consumers’ search activities and the various tasks they perform throughout the day, but also about understanding their reasons and the context around them. First-party data is a good place to start. For instance, website analytics inform about the kind of audiences you attract, CRM data show who buys your products, and customer support data cast light on consumers’ struggles. To complement these data sources, ad hoc surveys can capture consumers’ attitudes, motivations and triggers. For example, running a large-scale quantitative survey of first-time moms helps understand what their everyday looks like, where they are seeking advice, and how they handle caregiving issues. To give voice to that data, small-scale user studies enable you to hear directly from first-time moms (e.g., the types of searches they perform). As privacy regulations give consumers more control about how their data is used, we anticipate that consumer surveys will see renewed interest from brands. By encompassing what audiences express and how they interact with your brand, this approach makes it possible to truly know audiences as people. You can then develop actionable portraits rooted in data which help identify areas where your brand is well positioned to win with content and develop content roadmaps that truly address your audience needs.   Solve a problem To help consumers solve a problem, start with a shift in focus from the brand to the consumer. It is about adapting the brand response to the consumer moment, and recognising that all these moments are not necessarily about purchasing a product. For instance, Google has identified four pivotal micro-moments: I want to know, I want to go, I want to do, I want to buy. When first-time moms look to soothe their crying infants, they will often turn to search engines. The keywords they use carry a lot of intent and emotion. A search for “swaddle” may be about looking for a product, while a search for “swaddling” may be about looking for information on whether it is safe. In both cases, these keywords are proxies for the underlying problem: how to get a baby to sleep through the night. In the search engine result pages, results for the “swaddle” query are centred around products – which only partially addresses the bigger problem at play – and there is a lot of advertising competition. Conversely, the query “how to get a baby to sleep through the night” returns the “Interesting finds” component, which provides users the option to land on a content page. For brands, it is an opportunity to demonstrate they understand people’s intent and context, and to provide a valuable solution rather than focusing solely on the product and transaction. From telecom companies developing guides around improving Wi-Fi reception to water treatment companies educating consumers about contamination of water, this approach using value as the key factor to capture attention is applicable across all industries. By understanding intent and assessing the search engine results page and content types delivered, brands can much better assess not only the problem, but the best suited format for delivery, too - whether that is a video, an article, an image or other.   Deliver on expectations Delivering on expectations means ensuring that you are not only showing up when people search, but also that they can convert easily once they land on your website. This requires acting simultaneously in two dimensions: the user experience (UX) and the technical side. There is an important difference between a website that looks clean and a website that is truly user friendly. Analytics can help you detect the most problematic bottlenecks of your website. Then, user testing can help you understand the various reasons behind these bottlenecks, such as a frustrating product catalogue organisation, or an impractical checkout. These insights can help you address the most urgent pain points through A/B testing, and ultimately improve your UX. From a technical standpoint, there is a host of aspects to consider, starting with site speed. Site speed is fundamental in user experience, and has a strong influence on bounce rate and conversions. Marketers should regularly monitor their site speed, using online tools such as Google PageSpeed Insights. Additionally, UX plays an increasingly important role in search engine rankings. From May 2021, page experience signals (e.g., mobile friendliness) will be included in Google Search ranking. Simply put, UX is not only important for making the most of the attention of people who reach your website, but it also conditions your ability to get the attention of additional users through search results!     As one marketer out of two (48%) declares that not being consistent across every element of the consumer experience is a main challenge for long-term trust in their brand (iProspect 2020 Global Client Survey), strategic use of content presents a true opportunity to bring the experience together - from attention to transaction - by making the most of consumer intent and context through value.     This article is excerpted from the report Future Focus 2021: Brands Accelerated. Download it now for key insights on how brands can make the most of brand and performance to accelerate their growth. 0

5 mins read

News

Future Focus 2021: Brands Accelerated

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Trends from global conversation and what they mean for gaming

Trends from global conversation and what they mean for gaming

This article has been written by Lisa Cowie, Head of Agency Research at Twitter, and Thomas Bailly, Global Agency Lead at Twitter. When people care about something, they talk about it. There are hundreds of millions of Tweets sent everyday around the world. What we choose to share says something about us — about who we are, about what interests us, about what we believe in. Conversation gives a window into culture.          Whilst Twitter isn’t short of data, gaining insights from that data requires the right analytical tools. We partnered with Black Swan to analyse 300,000+ topics of conversation. Using AI-driven network science to map conversations into clusters, we looked over 2 years (Jan ‘19 - Dec ‘20) to detect evolving trends. Tweets were analysed across 8 markets - US, Canada, UK, France, Spain, Brazil, Australia and India.    Many conversations persist across markets From a macro perspective, people around the world are talking about a lot of the same things —  but they can manifest differently depending on the cultural context. Our analysis surfaced 6 key spaces:       Understanding culture isn’t about honing into one area that is most obviously connected to a brand or vertical. Conversation is fluid and therefore trends are interconnected. It’s important to consider all the ways that consumers are thinking and behaving, to know what matters to them across many facets of their lives.    Trend #1 - Wellbeing Of course, wellbeing. Conversation has increased by at least 40% in all markets. The notion of #ItsOkayNotToBeOkay has come to the fore, with increasingly frank and open exchanges. #CollectiveHealth. Wellbeing is increasingly being shaped by conversation around ‘communities of care’. Healthcare systems, nursing care, health tech, telehealth services and “looking out for each other” have all seen growth.   Trend #2 - Creator Culture A new generation of entrepreneurs and everyday makers is emerging: the creator class. Spanning those who create for a living through to everyday people who want to inject a bit of creativity into their days. #Participation. Everyone can create. Involvement is more prominent than ever. This notion is fueling the entertainment space as content proliferates from everyday creators and consumption becomes much more social. Conversation around creator culture has increased by +26% in the US and as much as +135% in Brazil.   Trend #3 - Everyday Wonder Escapism is a fundamental human desire. From the cosmos to spirituality to wanderlust, people are immersing themselves in content and experiences. There’s renewed wonder in imagined realities. Fantasy worlds, role-playing, cosplay, sci-fi, and superhero culture are providing ways for people to lose — and find — themselves. The conversation is steadily growing everywhere, with particular resonance in Spain, +35%, and Brazil, +31%.   Trend #4 - One Planet The notion of #BuildBackBetter is emerging as a key driver of the conversation around sustainability and the environment. #TheGreatReset in the US, #GreenRecovery in the UK or #Agenda2030 in Spain are setting the tone, with a focus on regeneration not just sustainability.  There has also been heightened interest in nature and local surroundings — from the impact of climate change to an appreciation for green spaces and the land around us.   Trend #5 - Tech Life A changing dialogue about the way we live, work, and create. As the pandemic hit, a burgeoning reliance on tech in our homes saw more mentions of everything from video calling to smart sensors to connected entertainment to ed tech. Tech Life is expansive - people are talking about smarter living, tech for good and tech angst. The conversation has grown between 30-40% across all markets.   Trend #6 - My Identity People are feeling more supported — and celebrated — to live out loud. #RepresentMe. Equality has become one of the most prominent themes on the platform, as individuals and communities push for real representation. This doesn’t stop at politics, it’s increasingly a topic within entertainment.  As people increasingly define themselves against their values, beliefs or ethics, #BeAnAlly and #TakeAStand are concepts that are gaining traction not just for individuals but within fandoms too. Who you stan says a lot about what you stan. People are realising the power of their fandoms to drive real social change.   The US is seeing the highest growth around this theme, 61%, but with 40%+ growth in all markets the conversation around identity is happening everywhere. ------------- We see those conversations shaping global culture. One of the recurring themes, showing up in conversation and making its way into mainstream culture, is gaming. Let’s look at how the gaming conversation has evolved, and what that means for content creators and brands.   Everyday prevalence of gaming Gaming is a huge area of opportunity for brands, irrespective of their vertical. It sits at the intersection of culture, tech, and content. Mainstream, but also a multitude of niche communities, gaming is spreading far and wide into peoples’ lives, accelerated by the pandemic.    ●2B+ gaming related Tweets globally in 2020, up +75% YOY   ●Globally, people on Twitter are 1.7X more likely to have a connected gaming console and 2.2X more likely to watch competitive video gaming, vs. those not on Twitter.   Gaming shows up within conversation in various ways, driving two of our trend spaces:   Gaming Focus Trend #1 - Creator Culture: Conversational Entertainment Game talk  A new era of gaming, one where games become social experiences. Mentions of games like Among Us, Animal Crossing, Pokemon and Fortnite have all seen huge growth. Conditions of the pandemic have driven usage, but these games inspire connection and conversation.   Streamers Gaming as video content. Increasing mentions of live streams show that gaming is also a consumption experience. #SupportSmallStreamers is gaining traction as more people move into the role of creator, putting out content for their audiences.   Gaming ecosystems Franchises are converging with film and music. In-game social events like concerts are driving conversation around music artists in the same context as gaming.     Gaming Focus Trend #2 - Everyday Wonder: Imaginative Escapism Nostalgic experiences As people seek out comfort in the familiar and iconic, classic franchises like Pokemon, Pacman, Mario, Star Wars characters and countless others have been delighting new and old fans alike.   Immersive narratives Not quite a video game, not quite a movie. Gaming is increasingly being talked about in the realms of characters, settings and stories as people desire full immersion into fantasy-worlds.   Beyond gaming itself Animal Crossing wasn’t just something to do during lockdowns. Conversation on Twitter spiraled into everyday dreaming about travel, holidays and IRL experiences. Hype and conversation around Cyberpunk, the long-awaited game, has moved into story-telling and cosplay (costume play) as people throw themselves into character role-playing.       Acting on the gaming phenomenon If it’s happening in the world, it’s happening on Twitter. Particularly when it comes to the gaming conversation, fans around the world come to Twitter to talk about the biggest moments of the year — the game drops, the fandom, and more, all year long. We see this in the consumption habits of our audiences — during live events, while attention shifts away from other social media, it shifts towards Twitter.   This is why game publishers and esports teams alike are prioritising using Twitter as an immediate distribution platform for their biggest moments. With Amplify, Twitter’s pre-roll video offering, brands can reach the younger demographic who are difficult to reach by TV and the increasing cord-cutters and cord-nevers. From always-on packages with our gaming press partners, to live events and esports opportunities, Twitter has a wide range of solutions to allow brands to align with premium, brand-safe content that resonates with a younger audience, globally.    For more information on Twitter Trends please visit marketing.twitter.com/trends  0

7 mins read

Future Focus 2021: Brands Accelerated

Future Focus 2021: Brands Accelerated

The new iProspect Future Focus report explores the intersection of consumer attention, commerce and data.    Today, we officially launch Future Focus 2021: Brands Accelerated as the essential read for conscientious marketers seeking to explore and exploit the latest consumer and industry advancements for brand growth. The 75+ page report addresses some of the most pressing aspects of modern marketing including; the battle for attention, wholesale changes in data privacy, and the emergence of assisted commerce.    Combining evidence-based research with interviews and responses from over 200 brand marketers in 29 countries, the Future Focus 2021: Brands Accelerated report delves deep into the challenges and opportunities faced in the current global climate and within the immediate media landscape. And, convenience and relevancy of media to the consumer is key, as 61% of marketers, polled for the report, considered ‘building a highly convenient experience for the consumer’ as the most powerful lever to generate business growth.i    The content of this sixth edition of the Future Focus series typifies the intricacies of bringing brand and performance together to achieve growth.     “Despite the challenging times we live in, I believe there have never been so many opportunities in media. With our new and unique approach of performance-driven brand building, we are firmly optimistic about the future and resolved to make it happen, today. With Future Focus 2021: Brands Accelerated as their guidebook, I hope all marketers will be able to leverage the growth potential afforded at these significant intersections of media, data, commerce and culture.”  Amanda Morrissey, Global President of iProspect    The findings showed that around 2 in 5 marketers (42%) still think the linear path to purchase is as relevant today as it was decades ago, despite the rise of digital. While at the same time 32% of marketers feel that expanding commerce capabilities is important for the 2021 roadmap, however 26% see this as one of the most difficult challenges this year.ii      Practical advice to marketers.   In addition to discussing and dissecting the impact of major global industry trends and innovations, the report spotlights the relevancy and opportunity for brands, regardless of sector, to capitalise on these seismic shifts in the media landscape. Examples of the report’s advice and guidance for marketers worldwide include:    #1: Commerce is Everywhere    Organisations should strive to build and maintain an accurate picture of their commerce capabilities across five key dimensions: desirability, availability, findability, buyability, and repeatability. This will help them define the most profitable commerce model for their brand, better integrate their e-commerce and stores into an actionable omnichannel strategy, explore new growth channels, and turn media opportunities into transaction opportunities.    #2 The Battle for Attention  Brands should consider factoring attention into their media optimisation and measurement efforts to elevate the impact and efficiency of their investment. To maximise audience attention, they should ensure the content and experiences they design truly align with consumer intent, and that the campaigns they develop do not relegate diversity and inclusivity as afterthoughts.  #3 The New Data Playbook    On the data front, organisations should embrace the new privacy-conscious world by re-evaluating the value exchange they offer to their audiences and anticipate technological changes to minimise business disruption. This is the occasion to explore opportunities for automation, evaluate the quality of the data they collect and process, and more broadly reflect upon how data is effectively used to inform decisions.    The last point is of particular significance as the report found in some circumstances there are huge disparities between what the consumer and brand marketer think, when it comes to assessing data value. Only 9% of marketers believe helping a company improve products or services is an incentive for consumers to share their data, while 44% of consumers believe it is a good enough reason to release personal identifiable information (PII) to the brand.iii     Download your copy of Future Focus 2021: Brands Accelerated now.    -----------------------------------------   [i] Proprietary omnibus survey: iProspect, 2020 Global Client Survey, 12 Oct–11 Nov 2020, 202 respondents. [ii] Proprietary omnibus survey: iProspect, 2020 Global Client Survey, 12 Oct–11 Nov 2020, 202 respondents. [iii] iProspect 2020 Global Client Survey (Oct 2020) and iProspect and Microsoft Advertising, Consumer Privacy and Data Survey (Mar 2020) 0

4 mins read

Straight Talk About Why Marketers Should Get Involved with Clubhouse and Social Audio

Straight Talk About Why Marketers Should Get Involved with Clubhouse and Social Audio

iProspect has contributed to the Insider Intelligence Clubhouse and Social Audio 2021 report which offers extensive knowledge into social audio and its rise. It gives us insights into social audio apps including Discord and the newfound favourite, Clubhouse, and shares vision into how and when marketers should get involved.   Current circumstances have introduced issues unmatched to anything we have previously seen. Minimal and limited daily human interaction and video conference fatigue are becoming the norm. “Participating in conversations in social audio apps—or even just listening to other human voices speak about topics that are important to them—fills yet another need for connection,” the report explains. It gives an opportunity for “authentic, unfiltered discourse” so many of us are craving.   Launched in 2015, the app Discord, notable for its voice chat feature, has experienced significant uptake since the start of the pandemic. “Discord is perhaps the most scaled and mature platform among social audio venues,” said Rohan Philips, chief product officer at performance marketing agency iProspect. “That’s primarily driven by gamers but it’s increasingly being adopted outside of gaming by communities and individuals.”   Discord hasn’t been the only app to prosper since the pandemic. Despite being just over a year old, Clubhouse has “became the poster child for the social audio trend after it entered a period of hyper growth.” Clubhouse is filling the void the pandemic accelerated and is exceeding many expectations in doing so. The report commented on its potential saying, “[P]eople who are aware of it believe it could eventually challenge its audio and social media progenitors.”   The recent rise of social audio and Clubhouse are hot on every marketer’s radar. Click here to download the report to find out more. This article is excerpted from the report Clubhouse and Social Audio 2021 report.  0

2 mins read

Shoppable AR Transforms eCommerce

Shoppable AR Transforms eCommerce

This article has been written by David Roter, VP Global Agency and Brand Partnerships, Snap Inc. and Heather O'Shea, Marketing Science Lead, Snap Inc.   Augmented reality (AR) is redefining the future of shopping and brand experiences. It empowers people to experience brands and products up close without needing to go to a store, enabling the ability to comfortably “try before you buy” and comparison shop with ease. For brands, AR is an incredibly powerful tool and helps solve business challenges — from reducing return rates to increasing loyalty with immersive experiences — AR unlocks avenues to reach potential customers far beyond traditional eCommerce offerings. The ongoing rise of smartphone ownership and camera usage enhances the impact of augmented reality for brands. Helen Papagiannis, the author of Augmented Human, details these trends in an article published in Harvard Business Review [1] . Her conclusion is that “AR has proven that it can add enormous value for consumers in the shopping journey”. Over the past year, Snapchat has been experimenting with Shoppable AR formats and evaluating the role of augmented reality as a performance channel, going beyond entertainment and fun to a true utility that drives business results. Our findings outline the immense opportunity for brands to amplify their eCommerce strategy and equip their business for these consumer habits of the future.   Augmented reality is truly a full-funnel format. Brands leverage AR on Snapchat to enable conversation about their brand, invite people into an immersive experience, facilitate product try-on and in-home-visualization, and activate useful formats for education. As such, we’ve found that augmented reality delivers full funnel performance. Through a global meta-analysis with research firm Kantar, we identified that when Snapchat CPG campaigns include an AR Lens, they drive 2.5x growth in ad awareness and 1.1x lift in action intent compared to Kantar's global CPG market norms benchmarks[2]. This trend holds true for the retail category as well - when Snapchat retail campaigns include an AR Lens, they drive 2x growth in ad awareness and 2x lift in action intent compared to Kantar's global retail market norms benchmarks [3]. Beyond brand lift, augmented reality campaigns also deliver significant ROI. In the US, Snap partnered with NCSolutions to analyze over 2 years of Snapchat CPG campaigns. We learned that campaigns that include AR Lenses demonstrated a 46% higher lift in penetration on average compared to campaigns without Lenses and drove 14% more incremental sales [4]. This inflated growth of incremental sales indicates that highly engaging branded AR experiences can convert users more quickly than traditional media formats.   Augmented reality is also gaining ground as the future of product trial and try-on. Nearly 200 million Snapchatters engage with AR every day [5], and 46% have used AR or VR as a virtual shopping tool. And interest continues to climb - nearly 8 in 10 are interested in visualizing products in the space around them as a way to enhance their shopping experiences [6]. We’ve built a behavior of daily AR use in the Snapchat camera, and consumers are ready to fully embrace this technology as a part of how they shop and compare products.   In 2020, we began deeper testing of Shoppable AR formats as we recognized a desire for our audience to interact with brands while safely staying home during the COVID-19 pandemic. We partnered with select advertisers, including dentsu clients, to test these formats over Q3 and Q4 of 2020. We developed tools like SnapML that offer users the ability to try on products such as shoes, sunglasses and makeup directly within Snapchat’s camera and seamlessly make a transaction if they like what they see. These immersive experiences have delivered outsized results for participating advertisers. 9 out of 10 of these campaigns drove an increase in ad awareness [7], and because of the immersive experiences the camera allows for, we’ve seen these Product Experience Lens campaigns were 2x as likely to drive Intent lift than Snapchat Q3-Q4 Norms [8].   Notably, dentsu partnered with Snapchat for two recent best-in-class shoppable AR campaigns. Gucci embarked on their first-ever global AR shoe “try-on” campaign, using SnapML technology to let Snapchatters virtually try on Gucci shoes. After seeing how they looked in the brand’s latest sneakers, Snapchatters were able to purchase the shoes directly from the Lens via a “Shop Now” button, generating positive ROAS as a result [9]. Using their Business Profile as their virtual storefront, Dior (LVMH) launched several new Lenses for their B27 sneaker launch that delivered 3.8X ROAS for their overall campaign [10]. Augmented reality is no longer simply an experiment. For many marketers, it’s becoming a core element of their eCommerce strategy. The wide variety of AR formats can be activated to achieve marketing objectives throughout the funnel, and as more consumers seek out AR shopping experiences, brands have an opportunity to own shoppable innovation within their category with a high rate of proven success. Platforms like Snapchat are best positioned to help retailers tap into this powerful new format. We have a highly engaged audience of 265 million daily active users [11], nearly 200 million of which engage with AR on a daily basis [12]. We’ve evolved our AR products to address utility and commerce in response to consumer needs and we make it easy for advertisers to build creative through our best-in-class creative strategy team and free turnkey products like Lens web builder. This brings newfound opportunities for brands to cut-through the clutter and achieve growth while future-proofing their approach to eCommerce.     [1] Source: Helen Papagiannis, “How AR is redefining retail in the pandemic”, Harvard Business Review, October 2020 [2] Source: Kantar Snapchat CPG campaign brand lift meta-analysis commissioned by Snap, Inc., February 2021 [3] Source: Kantar Snapchat Retail campaign brand lift meta-analysis commissioned by Snap, Inc., February 2021 [4] Source: NCSolutions CPG Reaction studies Q1 2017 - Q4 2019 [5] Source: Snap Inc. Internal data Q1 2020. See Snap Inc. public filings with the SEC. [6] Source: Alter Agents study commissioned by Snap, Inc.; May 2020 [7] Source: Snap Inc. internal data as of February 2021 [8] Source: Snap Inc. internal data as of February 2021 [9] Snap Inc. internal data June 28-August 17, 2020 [10] Source: Data from Snap Ads Manager as of October 29 - December 20, 2020. Lookback window: 28 days post-swipe, 1 day post-view. [11] Source: Snap Inc. internal data Q4 2020 vs. Q4 2019. See Snap Inc. public filings with the SEC. [12] Source: Snap Inc. Internal data Q1 2020. See Snap Inc. public filings with the SEC.     0

6 mins read

SOCIETAL RESPONSIBILITY IS THE BRAND KINGMAKER IN 2021

SOCIETAL RESPONSIBILITY IS THE BRAND KINGMAKER IN 2021

Climate crisis, social justice, privacy rights… as people’s expectations change and consumer scrutiny increases, companies must adapt to societal evolutions if they are to remain relevant and grow. Being the closest ones to consumers and the ones responsible for driving brand response, marketers have a critical role in promoting a societal agenda within the organisation – uncovering new growth opportunities at the intersection of marketing and society.   The new reality for brands People are increasingly questioning their own consumption decisions, not only asking themselves, “What is best for my wallet?” but also, “What is fair for all parties involved?” There is an increasing public consciousness about the power people can have on brands, and about the ability of brands to effect positive change through their marketing dollars. In light of these societal changes, some brands have doubled down towards social consciousness, some have ‘dipped their toes’ in using their media budgets as ways of influence, and others have so far kept a distance to avoid becoming embroiled in an increasingly polarized conversation. But this later stance is quickly becoming untenable, as scrutiny increases from consumers and employees who do not hesitate to publicly call out internal communications that contradict their own beliefs.   The practical guide to societal responsibility There is no secret recipe for brands to become socially irreproachable overnight. However, there are some key considerations to drastically improve their societal impact.  Bring it to the top of your agenda. Too often, we see societal priorities wrongfully depicted as a thorn in the side of business conduct, whereas they are generators of economic value. Drive change from the inside out. Consumers and employees are two sides of the same coin. If you want to be relevant to diverse audiences, you need to see this diversity in your organisation, and empower these multiple voices. Use empathy as your guiding principle. Real change requires true self-awareness and empathy. It’s okay to not get everything right if you are genuine in your intent. It is a beneficial journey that brands need to take as they become more responsible. Be both ambitious and meticulous. The path to responsibility requires an ambitious strategy, yet one broken down into concrete steps that enable incremental changes all along the journey. A clear framework to measure progress is critical. Communicate with openness and authenticity. Document your journey and how you measure your efforts in a very genuine and transparent fashion – including the shortcomings you face. It is an excellent way to build consumer trust.   The critical role of media There is clear added value in using simple and accessible communications to help overwhelmed consumers sort through the apparent complexity of societal topics. For instance, combining convenience and transparency is a great way to empower people to shop sustainably, as illustrated by the Farmer Connect app that helps consumers easily trace the origin of their coffee.[i] From a content perspective, brands can provide an open platform to connect with users and influencers on topics such as inclusivity by sharing stories, inspiration and experiences. It’s not only about showing what the brand does well, but about recognising that good ideas can come from anywhere by giving them a voice. The good news for brands is that they are not alone on this path toward becoming more responsible selves. For instance, dentsu, iProspect’s parent company, pilots DIMPACT, a pioneering tool to manage the media industry’s digital carbon footprint. The DIMPACT web-based tool, created in collaboration with the University of Bristol, calculates the greenhouse gas emissions associated with serving media content, and can therefore be used to help advertisers select lower carbon alternatives as part of their digital media strategy. - Marketing has always been about understanding people to deliver the most valuable product and service to them. In an age where people’s rising expectations around inclusivity, privacy, sustainability and transparency intersect with their consumption choices, embedding societal considerations in the company’s strategy is not a distraction to business conduct. It is the essence of marketing – the most powerful growth vector for organisations, today and tomorrow.   [i] Farmer Connect website, as accessed on Feb 26, 2020 - link   0

4 mins read

Building Powerful Experiences to Capture Attention

Building Powerful Experiences to Capture Attention

Desire, confidence, shock, delight. Emotions play a critical – if not the most important – role in communication. They capture hearts and minds, build relationships, and urge action. Yet, according to the iProspect 2020 Global Client Survey, a third (34%) of marketers declare the lack of emotional connection is a challenge for increasing long-term consumer trust in their brand. Here are three inspiring and recent examples of companies embedding emotions such as excitement, fascination, and surprise at the heart of their communications to build attention-grabbing experiences.   Enhanced reality Brands able to add a new layer of reality to everyday experiences and provide a new perspective, as a result, can deliver a deep yet scalable immersion into their world. Not all experiences have to be grandiose and high tech - simple ideas with impeccable execution are often the best. To promote tourism amongst New Yorkers, the Austrian Tourism Board designed an immersive AR audio wherein Vienna’s most famous son, Beethoven, guided users through specific Manhattan locations that are related to Austria. Through the combination of geofencing, 3D sound effects, and exciting stories, people were able to discover the Austrian connection of locations such as Aldo Sohm Wine Bar, Café Sabarsky and Carnegie Hall. By letting New Yorkers experience their city in a whole new way, this campaign created five times more impressions through owned and earned media than paid media budget.   Where music and culture meet  Sonos have always focused on ensuring their products deliver greater sound quality than the competition and wanted to showcase this in a campaign that would deliver premium sound messaging through environments where music and culture meet.  To do so, Sonos used out-of-home (OOH) advertising to deliver visual impact across iconic locations with a connection to music such as the Opera station in Paris and the Hamburg docks. To own relevant cultural environments, Sonos also used OOH during an audio exhibit at Barbican station in London and around the major music complex Philharmonie in Paris. This OOH strategy increased aided awareness by 82%.  Additionally, Sonos partnered with popular podcast hosts, specifically those who were Sonos fans, to give authentic testimonials to their audiences about the sound quality of Sonos products. This strategy delivered a 19% uplift in consumers’ association of Sonos with superior sound quality and a six-fold increase in unaided awareness vs. control.  Sonos also created a bespoke “Brilliant Sound hub” on Amazon Prime offering discounts on select films with quality sound and connecting their brilliant sound proposition with the big screen. More than 40% of Prime users clicked to view the hub, and that increased consumer searches for Sonos products on Amazon.    Multi-sensory experiences As most brands mainly rely on visual cues to communicate their messages, the ones leveraging other senses as well stand a much better chance of creating deep-rooted memories. Sound drives brand recognition like nothing else, while smells are a shortcut to emotions. Hendrick’s Gin wanted to offer a surprising and refreshing detour to Londoners during the dullest time of the day: their commute. The brand used a 1,000-square-metre vinyl wrap to cover the floors and walls of the 74-meter-long tunnel in the capital’s busiest station with illustrations from its imaginative world, such as floating beluga whales, hot-air balloons, and dapper gentlemen atop unicycles. The installation featured 20 scented posters immersing commuters in Hendrick’s signature scent, a rose-and-cucumber infusion. More than 400,000 people experienced this multi-sensory and distinctive campaign, and five times as many through the pictures shared on social media by delighted commuters. Guides such as Lonely Planet even featured the experience as a must-visit in the city.     These examples show how brands can build powerful experiences to capture the attention of new and existing consumers. By combining emotional value for people and fidelity to their brand territory, marketers can turn attention into memorable experiences that build their brands, one moment at a time.     This article is excerpted from the report Future Focus 2021: Brands Accelerated. Download it now for key insights on how brands can make the most of brand and performance to accelerate their growth. 0

4 mins read

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